Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT Linux Performance

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • aht0
    replied
    I could get miner-Vega64 (about 8months of mining under hood) with 1y factory warranty (MSI card) left for 200€. Should I risk it? (Local, not from ebay)

    As I understand it, Vega64 with 8GB HBA2 should beat Nvidia 16xx series without breaking a sweat. MSI's fact.warranty should be ok-ish too.

    Leave a comment:


  • dimko
    replied
    Originally posted by Slartifartblast View Post

    Yes thank you, joint honours in Chemistry and Biochemistry. Now there will be no more correspondence on my part as this has degenerated into a rather tedious melodrama that I have no intention of participating in any further.

    Good day and goodbye.
    grabbing a popcorn...

    At least your degree is not humanitarian.

    Leave a comment:


  • aht0
    replied
    Thanks guys. Ill just wait and see then.

    Leave a comment:


  • arQon
    replied
    Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
    I would wait a month or two until RX 5600 benchmarks, pricepoints and configurations (6GB/8GB of GDDR6 memory?, number of compute units) are released before deciding whether to buy an RX 590.
    I would second that. Assuming a 5600 is at least announced (if not actually launched) at CES along with the 5800, it SHOULD (as atomsymbol says) land roughly level with the 1660S. If it doesn't, forget it.

    Leave a comment:


  • atomsymbol
    replied
    Originally posted by aht0 View Post
    I had recently chance to use Nvidia and Radeon simultaneously and I think latter offered better picture quality tho. Comments?
    RX 570 has a noticeably better color saturation (from my personal viewpoint) than an older Nvidia GTX 750, using the same monitor. But this is just a single datapoint, and I don't have enough experience with how the default color saturation on other (newer) Nvidia cards compares to current AMD GPUs.

    Originally posted by aht0 View Post
    After recent Radeon-loaner, I am considering buying new RX590 or 580 for myself (new because I don't want cards whored by cryptominers). Can you be more specific about the issues you've had?
    I would wait a month or two until RX 5600 benchmarks, pricepoints and configurations (6GB/8GB of GDDR6 memory?, number of compute units) are released before deciding whether to buy an RX 590.

    If RX 5600 isn't going to have 28-32 compute units (that is: positioned directly in the middle between RX 5500 and RX 5700) then it is going to be a mistake because the number of compute units in Nvidia Turing GPUs is evenly spread across a wide range of options: 14, 20, 24, 30, 34, 36, 40, 46, 48 and 80 (although 1 AMD's compute unit isn't a direct equivalent of 1 Nvidia's compute unit in terms of performance).

    Leave a comment:


  • arQon
    replied
    Originally posted by aht0 View Post
    Have you tried to extract "driver pieces" from installer and install just those without the extraneous bloat? I've done so with Nvidia's
    Yeah, I used to do that too, especially back in the early "GeForce Experience" days.

    I didn't try it with the AMD drivers this time around, and you're right: I should have. Thanks for the reminder.

    Leave a comment:


  • arQon
    replied
    Originally posted by aht0 View Post
    Have you tested on multiple different cards or you are having an issue just with your own? Following what's written in reddit, cards seem to differ in quality from vendor to vendor (Sapphire's being the best).
    Cards ABSOLUTELY differ in quality, often to an extreme extent (cf the recent MSI and EVGA trainwrecks). Sapphire is indeed generally the best AIB, and that's been the case since the ATI days, with Powercolor a close second and the two occasionall trading places depending on the specific SKU.
    But no, that's got nothing to do with this. You don't have to look any further than GN - which tested literally *every* 5700XT, for weeks on end - to understand that the problem is the drivers. As is the custom fan curve bug, the various sensor reporting bugs, and so on.

    > Ain't that much different from systemd then (network connected, PID1, nice wide attack surface)

    Yeah, and I have the same problem with developers being that stupid there too. :P
    Unfortunately, nobody ever learns, because either marketing demands a stupid gimmick or the devs are so arrogant that all the previous 500 exploits were just because "THOSE guys weren't smart enough. I'M perfect though, so it won't happen with MY code". sigh. (And then being too stupid and arrogant to admit they were wrong when theirs gets pwned too, instead saying "okay, yeah, but it was just this ONE tiny mistake in the code, and we've fixed that, so now it's perfect"...)

    > Nvidia's performance sure is better, I had recently chance to use Nvidia and Radeon simultaneously and I think latter offered better picture quality tho. Comments?

    There's a lot you can do to affect both of those on a driver level. Automatic texture mipping is historically the biggest one, but these days shader replacement is so commonplace that it might even have the crown now.

    Texture stuff will be exposed in the driver controls, with "Quality" generally meaning "just leave the goddam textures alone", "Standard" generally meaning "screw around with texture compression and/or mipping, POSSIBLY somewhat-intelligently but probably not", and "Performance" generally meaning "compress everything, and potentially quarter it all too".

    One way to check that USED to work well for the second form, and probably still does, is to just rename the binary. If you can see a difference when you do that, the driver is replacing shaders to make itself look better in benchmarks. (Or, you know, "To ensure that our users get the best possible gaming experience", if you're a bit less cynical about it. :P)

    > After recent Radeon-loaner, I am considering buying new RX590 or 580 for myself (new because I don't want cards whored by cryptominers).

    Just FYI, miners tend to treat their cards BETTER than average. After all, if it thermal-throttles, you make less $. Mining generally also doesn't benefit from GPU OC (but VRAM OC instead, though it depends on the coin), so they won't have been driven to the wall for years.

    The 5xx series are a very good buy right now in terms of Perf/$. HOWEVER, AMD is ALREADY not supporting them properly in their drivers, just a year after release, and it's important to be aware of that if there's some specific piece of functionality you want from the driver.
    Depending on what you can get a 580/590 for, it might be worth stepping up to a 1660S. That's literally the ONLY card worth mentioning between the 5xx series and the $350 price point of the 2060 non-S and 5700 non-XT, but it's a VERY good card for the money if you can stretch to one.

    > Can you be more specific about the issues you've had?

    No different to anyone else's really: all of this is extremely commonplace. Fan control doesn't work reliably, fan curves likewise; the Radeon Settings app (on Windows, at least) crashes constantly, has visual artifacts, etc (note that this is WITHOUT overclocking).
    The fan issue can be a huge pain, since if a hard reset is the only way to resolve it you may be stuck with a loud fan it until you're in a good position TO reboot. (Note that the bug only seems to occur when REDUCING fan speed: you can INcrease it just fine).

    The best approach used to be to get the "core" driver - which was ONLY a driver, without all the gimmicks - and use Afterburner for OCing etc. (Which, since it's a much better tool for the job meant you'd be using that anyway).

    > Nvidia drivers are also telemetry-enabled (sending routinely data out).

    On Windows, they all are. sigh. I haven't Wiresharked the AMD ones lately, but at the very least the fact that it's constantly insisting that I update to a newer version - and let's be very clear here: this is without me EVER checking for updates from within the driver panel - means it's phoning home, and there's no way to turn that off. IOW, AMD gives exactly as many f**ks about your privacy as nvidia does, and is happy to treat you with the same total lack of respect.

    ON LINUX, I'm okay with the AMD driver, as long as you don't expect a lot of the core functionality to work. I consider that sort of a fair trade for the better Perf/$ of the 5700XT over the 2060S. And if OSS drivers are important to you, AMD is realistically your only option.
    (Note that AMD completely missed the ball with the 5500 though: you shouldn't be buying that under any circumstances, unless you're a die-hard AMD fanboy).

    ON LINUX, the issues that *nvidia* has wrt to things like reclocking, passthrough, etc, means your options are realistically "No OSS driver, or no nvidia". If that matters to you, AMD is your only choice regardless of the problems their drivers have. The nvidia binary driver though, all the tirades about Freedom aside, is still very very good.

    ON WINDOWS - which matters if you're using KVM and passthrough too - the AMD driver is garbage. But to be fair, MOST of it is MOSTLY functional, MOST of the time. It's "good enough, maybe". It's "fine for typical use". Sort of.

    ON WINDOWS, the nvidia driver is unquestionably king. If you dualboot for gaming (or have a Windows VM with passthrough, "Error 43" notwithstanding), nvidia is where you want to be. There's very little bad that can be said about it. Obviously we'd all prefer for them to not be such total dicks wrt Linux, but that doesn't change how good the Windows driver is.

    HTH

    Leave a comment:


  • aht0
    replied
    Originally posted by arQon View Post
    AMD used to also release "sane" versions of the drivers, without all this "Gaming Evolved v2" crap in them. Those versions may still exist, but if so they've been hidden even further out of sight lately. So now, if you want your hardware to be usable at all (on Windows, at least) the only option you have is this "gamer-iffic" gimmick-laden monstrosity.
    Have you tried to extract "driver pieces" from installer and install just those without the extraneous bloat? I've done so with Nvidia's - unpacked whole executable with 7z, erased folders useless to me (Shield drivers, Nvidia HDMI Sound drivers, Geforce Experience, Telemetry etc) and allowed Windows itself to "search for drivers" from that root folder of the extracted driver. After Windows has found driver for primary GPU, rest that unpacked folder I would simply delete.

    I kind of remember that I also used to unpack Catalyst drivers (chipset/cpu/usb3) and incorporate these into Windows iso. So in theory same approach should work for Radeon drivers.

    Leave a comment:


  • arQon
    replied
    The bigger problem is simply this: AMD's drivers have been unequivocably broken for literally years now. Things don't get into that sort of state as a result of one-off crunches etc, but because of systemic problems like a corporate culture of "bugs aren't important" and / or a technology team that is woefully mismanaged or under the thumb of a marketing department that thinks a sufficiently red and black color scheme is the only thing a piece of software actually needs, regardless of how much of its core functionality doesn't even work.

    AMD used to also release "sane" versions of the drivers, without all this "Gaming Evolved v2" crap in them. Those versions may still exist, but if so they've been hidden even further out of sight lately. So now, if you want your hardware to be usable at all (on Windows, at least) the only option you have is this "gamer-iffic" gimmick-laden monstrosity.

    Leave a comment:


  • aht0
    replied
    Originally posted by arQon View Post
    Just FYI, that's not an "in Linux" problem. Reducing fan speed is also broken in Windows: sometimes it might work if you leave it for 5-10 mins, other times you're looking at a reboot.
    Like almost everything else to do with AMD's drivers, it's broken, it's been broken for literally years, and it will doubtless STAY broken for years longer.
    Have you tested on multiple different cards or you are having an issue just with your own? Following what's written in reddit, cards seem to differ in quality from vendor to vendor (Sapphire's being the best).

    Originally posted by arQon View Post
    AMD's drivers are absolute garbage. (Sorry bridgman). Every year they put a new coat of paint on them and add a stupid new gimmick to them (this year's was a web browser - because what you really need on a Windows machine is a process running with SYSTEM rights and an attack surface the size of Texas. What could possibly go wrong with THAT brilliant idea?), but the core functionality hasn't worked properly in longer than anyone can remember.
    Ain't that much different from systemd then (network connected, PID1, nice wide attack surface), tho I don't think that particular process is running under SYSTEM privileges on Windows.

    Originally posted by arQon View Post
    The drivers are so bad that they're enough of a reason to buy an nvidia card instead, despite the nontrivially-worse perf per dollar and even with full knowledge of nvidia's terrible past behavior. It breaks my heart.
    Nvidia's performance sure is better, I had recently chance to use Nvidia and Radeon simultaneously and I think latter offered better picture quality tho. Comments?
    After recent Radeon-loaner, I am considering buying new RX590 or 580 for myself (new because I don't want cards whored by cryptominers). Can you be more specific about the issues you've had?

    Originally posted by arQon View Post
    Oh - and let's not forget the ads built into the drivers, which are more obnoxious than a Facebook page these days.
    The driver package is *over a GIG now* because of all this crap - but basic functionality still just doesn't work, and at this point it's obvious that RTG just doesn't even care any more. It's insane.
    Nvidia drivers are also telemetry-enabled (sending routinely data out).

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X