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AMD Announces Navi 14 Based Radeon RX 5500 Series

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  • Danny3
    replied
    Originally posted by cynyr View Post

    just use a 2200G or 3200G for that. Plenty of grunt GPU wise for that.
    I plan to make their computers as future-proof as possible and good for movies watching.
    For best video quality I need something that can decode 4K, HDR, HFR and transmit it to the tv on a separate output.
    The integrated GPU leaves this to the motherboard which most likely has only one output and even on that might not have the latest versions of HDMI or Displayport.
    So, I want to use a dedicated GPU for this, but a silent one (fanless).

    Leave a comment:


  • cynyr
    replied
    Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
    Nice, but I hope they will release a version also with passive cooling that I can put in parents computers, because for their needs, (browsing, watching videos on Youtube or with Kodi) it will be great to have the GPU silent.
    just use a 2200G or 3200G for that. Plenty of grunt GPU wise for that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jabberwocky
    replied
    Originally posted by caligula View Post

    Keep in mind 2600k, 2700k, and i3770k can easily be overclocked. 10-15% is simple with Noctua heatsink and 120mm fan. If you have a dedicated system for gaming, you can turn off all mitigations and background services. If you need more disk bandwidth, set up RAID0. 1200 MB/s isn't that far from NVMe M.2 SSD performance. Many games don't need the full 16x PCIe 3/4 bandwidth. You might lose few fps, but it's not really a problem unless you're a hardcore FPS gamer.
    If you are willing to mod your BIOS you should be able to use M.2 NVMe with sandy-/ivy motherboards. I had a 3770 & Q77 chipset which I BIOS modded. I used a PCI-E to M.2 adaptor and ran Samsung NVMe 960 evo with no problems. They simply did not provide the updates to force people to buy new hardware.

    I upgraded to Ryzen 2700X (needed more PCI-E lanes) and gave my 3770 to a friend who's 2500k stopped working. He doesn't play super demanding games, but plays very competitively. does not have any complaints using it with a Rx 580 and 144Hz monitor. If it wasn't for the cost of electricity and limited PCI-E lanes I would not mind still using a overclocked 3770k.

    The rx 5500 doesn't look too impressive with only 128-bit memory. I'm still wondering if I should get a 5700 XT or not. I'm very interested in undervolting it. People on reddit claim to get boost clock of 1901 MHz @ 975mV. If I can get that I'd be very happy, still waiting for more cards and info before I buy.

    Leave a comment:


  • caligula
    replied
    Originally posted by arQon View Post

    Jep. I don't have anything QUITE that old - by a whole year :P - but an Ivy-era i7 is still more than enough for almost anything even now, CPU-wise. With the hype of 4K displays in particular over the last few years, there also may be quite a few casual gamers who need to push a lot more pixels than before but don't have any higher geometry demands.
    Keep in mind 2600k, 2700k, and i3770k can easily be overclocked. 10-15% is simple with Noctua heatsink and 120mm fan. If you have a dedicated system for gaming, you can turn off all mitigations and background services. If you need more disk bandwidth, set up RAID0. 1200 MB/s isn't that far from NVMe M.2 SSD performance. Many games don't need the full 16x PCIe 3/4 bandwidth. You might lose few fps, but it's not really a problem unless you're a hardcore FPS gamer.

    Leave a comment:


  • arQon
    replied
    Originally posted by caligula View Post
    It's the only thing that needs an upgrade. E.g. the 2011 2700k paired with 16 gigs of RAM and 1TB SSD is perfectly fine for gaming https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us...-3-90-ghz.html
    Jep. I don't have anything QUITE that old - by a whole year :P - but an Ivy-era i7 is still more than enough for almost anything even now, CPU-wise. With the hype of 4K displays in particular over the last few years, there also may be quite a few casual gamers who need to push a lot more pixels than before but don't have any higher geometry demands.

    Leave a comment:


  • artivision
    replied
    Any way to use OpenCL? My attempt with Ffmpeg x264 CL resulted to 1.7x speed and full Cpu load.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by artivision View Post

    Tried with Polaris and its terrible. The default gives me 2.6x speed, big size for selected Mbps and cannot play a half file. I was expecting like a 10x for a 5.5Tflops Gpu.
    Can confirm that with my RX 580:

    Code:
    ffmpeg -hwaccel vaapi -hwaccel_device /dev/dri/renderD128 -hwaccel_output_format vaapi -i not_a_downloaded_legion_episode.mkv -c:v h264_vaapi -level 4.2 -profile high -b:v 2M -c:a copy output.mp4
    To convert video for the PS4 gives me:

    Code:
    frame= 1711 fps= 61 q=-0.0 Lsize=   19316kB time=00:01:12.15 bitrate=2193.0kbits/s speed=2.55x

    Leave a comment:


  • fuzz
    replied
    Originally posted by artivision View Post

    Tried with Polaris and its terrible. The default gives me 2.6x speed, big size for selected Mbps and cannot play a half file. I was expecting like a 10x for a 5.5Tflops Gpu.
    I agree it's not great, but as far as I know it doesn't use all those Tflops. It uses the video encoding chip on the card -- Video Coding Engine (VCE)

    Leave a comment:


  • artivision
    replied
    Originally posted by fuzz View Post

    https://trac.ffmpeg.org/wiki/Hardware/VAAPI
    https://wiki.libav.org/Hardware/vaapi

    At least with ffmpeg, the key appears to be "-vaapi_device /dev/dri/renderD128 -vf 'format=nv12,hwupload' -c:v h264_vaapi".

    I mostly used emby for this so haven't done much of the command line myself.

    EDIT: Use vainfo to make sure your card supports the h264 profile you're targeting.

    For example my 7770 only supports the following:
    Code:
    vainfo: Supported profile and entrypoints
    VAProfileMPEG2Simple : VAEntrypointVLD
    VAProfileMPEG2Main : VAEntrypointVLD
    VAProfileNone : VAEntrypointVideoProc
    Tried with Polaris and its terrible. The default gives me 2.6x speed, big size for selected Mbps and cannot play a half file. I was expecting like a 10x for a 5.5Tflops Gpu.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hibbelharry
    replied
    Originally posted by Venemo View Post
    Laptop chips haven't supported PCIe atomics. So if you get an external GPU box with an AMD GPU, and connect that to your laptop, you won't be able to use the compute capability of the AMD card.
    That's mostly a niche, isn't it? Bulldozer didn't sell well, but i bet external GPUs used to do OpenCL, attached to now legacy notebooks, are quite uncommon. Like 10 per continent.

    Originally posted by tuxd3v View Post
    I disagree with that..
    NVidia is proprietary, and that for us( me included ) is bad, but I do need to give them credits for the longevity stacks they have..
    I've had the opposite experience, quite often. I once had a notebook which fell into this non-support case, I did use a nvidia-based HTPC at home, and do try to keep PCs in our company working. We do software development in a mostly linux environment, which is CPU and RAM intensive, but not taxing any GPU. There are quite some Core i5 machines where I did remove that nvidia crap for failing after updates. It's just much more efficient if I swap out those bastard low spec Geforce 500/600/700 cards for an AMD based card than fiddling around with patching dkms packages over and over again.

    Leave a comment:

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