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AMD Radeon Pro WX 3200 Announced As A Small Form Factor $199 USD Workstation Card

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  • lostdistance
    replied
    Originally posted by microcode View Post
    Cool, I was looking for basically exactly this card. Needed four DisplayPorts and a bit of GPU juice; and 200USD is a reasonable price for that.
    This card looks very similar to the Radeon Pro WX 4100 which has been on sale for a few years now. The main difference seems to be 10 CUs in the WX 3200 vs. 16 CUs in the WX 4100.

    https://www.amd.com/en/products/prof...on-pro-wx-3200
    https://www.amd.com/en/products/prof...on-pro-wx-4100

    Leave a comment:


  • aht0
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    Yeah, but it kind of sucks in regards to value since it's only slightly better than a 560 in some regards and worse in others.

    Might as well buy a $170 8GB RX 570 with some games bundle to get better performance, twice the memory, less money, and some games in the process.
    No you might not. It's "professional" card, meaning: not for games but for CAD/CAM. Gaming cards lack ECC vRAM and required floating point precision/computational capability for such purposes.
    It's all about using proper tool for a particular job. CAD/CAM requires precision from microns to kilometers, gaming cards generally fail at providing such (games never require anything like this) and if not (rare exceptions), lack of error correction means, errors creeping in won't be corrected.
    In real world it might manifest in some bridge collapsing or building falling apart due to error in structural calculations.

    ​​​​​​​Yeah, you may learn CAD/CAM using gaming card, just mess around and familiarize yourself with the programs. For serious work, forget it.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    get the low slot profile stuff and extra display ports, but other than that it isn't a very worthwhile card. 4GB of ram for 8K...you know as well as I do that that's barely adequate; probably with gimmicky "look what we can do" level of performance like regular Nvidia cards running ray tracing stuff have when compared to actual RTX cards.
    4GB is more than plenty for a general-purpose 8K desktop GPU. I don't think you understand who the target market is of this GPU. This isn't for people watching movies, playing games, video editing, or CAD. It's ideal for people like administrators, stock market analysts, and surveillance systems. Basically, nothing that really needs much compute power at all but needs a lot of screen real-estate.
    It's not like this GPU has ECC or lots of other "Pro" features. Going by the "features" tab at AMD.com, the only things it has that the RX 570 doesn't is OpenGL 4.6*, 8K, Radeon Pro Renderer support**, and some more ports. It's seems to me like AMD just tweaked the firmware on some overstock RX 550 and 560 chips and slapped them on older WX boards to get rid of excess inventories.
    That's because it doesn't need ECC. It isn't supposed to run the intensive tasks you think it should. But yes, you're probably right that this is made from spare 550s and 560s.
    Basically, if form-factor, OpenGL 4.6*, 8K, or the extra ports aren't deciding factors then an RX 570 is the better choice, gaming GPU or not really isn't a factor since it's just a better all around GPU and costs less -- they have 8GB Asus 570s on sale for $150 right now over at Newegg...
    I agree, but that's a lot of differences. Look on Newegg for another low-profile single-slot GPU with 4 display connectors and you'll probably find only 2 or 3 total, from any brand. This card may seem overpriced, but it's very niche and they're taking advantage of that. I actually knew someone who had this GPU's predecessor, and he took full advantage of its "quirkiness" without any issues. It was a 2GB GCN 1.0 card. Mostly all he ran on it was MS Office and some web browsers. That card would not keep up with modern high-res displays, but the WX 3200 can.
    Sort of related -- After looking at so many "feature" tabs today, AMD really needs to asterisk the stuff that Linux doesn't support or is Windows' Only, like Virtual Super Resolution. Outside of gaming I like to VSR Windows to 2K from 1080p and I kind of feel cheated when I see that listed as a supported feature when it's really just a Windows feature.
    I agree, though I've grown to accept that unless a manufacturer explicitly states what is supported on Linux, assume nothing is supported beyond some primitive functionality.
    Last edited by schmidtbag; 02 July 2019, 07:09 PM.

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  • microcode
    replied
    Cool, I was looking for basically exactly this card. Needed four DisplayPorts and a bit of GPU juice; and 200USD is a reasonable price for that.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    Well, nobody buys a workstation GPU like this for the sake of gaming. What you're paying for is better reliability, better customer support, and in this case, 4x display connectors in pretty much the smallest form factor a GPU can get. It's meant for a multi-monitor office PC. I'm not sure you can get a single-slot low-profile RX 570, regardless of the amount of display outputs it supports.
    I get the low slot profile stuff and extra display ports, but other than that it isn't a very worthwhile card. 4GB of ram for 8K...you know as well as I do that that's barely adequate; probably with gimmicky "look what we can do" level of performance like regular Nvidia cards running ray tracing stuff have when compared to actual RTX cards.

    It's not like this GPU has ECC or lots of other "Pro" features. Going by the "features" tab at AMD.com, the only things it has that the RX 570 doesn't is OpenGL 4.6*, 8K, Radeon Pro Renderer support**, and some more ports. It's seems to me like AMD just tweaked the firmware on some overstock RX 550 and 560 chips and slapped them on older WX boards to get rid of excess inventories.

    Basically, if form-factor, OpenGL 4.6*, 8K, or the extra ports aren't deciding factors then an RX 570 is the better choice, gaming GPU or not really isn't a factor since it's just a better all around GPU and costs less -- they have 8GB Asus 570s on sale for $150 right now over at Newegg...

    Realistically, only the ports and form factor are deciding factors here. 4GB is rather lame for 8K and there isn't enough OGL 4.6 content for that to even matter.

    *Depending on what RX 570 you pick, it might support OpenGL 4.6. OEM ones do and regular ones don't...go figure...

    **RX 580s beat WX 7200s, their workstation counterpart, in benchmarks and they don't technically support Radeon Pro Renderer either. Nvidia desktop GPUs kick ass as well. Just to show that "professional workstation cards" aren't necessarily needed for "professional workstation tasks" with modern GPUs...especially this GPU since it's really only Pro in name and could have just as easily been called RX 565 Low Profile because that is what it is...I guess 8K text editing is supposed to make it a Pro card...

    Sort of related -- After looking at so many "feature" tabs today, AMD really needs to asterisk the stuff that Linux doesn't support or is Windows' Only, like Virtual Super Resolution. Outside of gaming I like to VSR Windows to 2K from 1080p and I kind of feel cheated when I see that listed as a supported feature when it's really just a Windows feature.

    Leave a comment:


  • wizard69
    replied
    Interesting board but I’m still surprised it is Polaris based. Given that I’m looking at a CAD engineering workstation build in the fall. I will have to keep this card in mind even if it might be a bit underpowered for a long term build.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
    Yeah, but it kind of sucks in regards to value since it's only slightly better than a 560 in some regards and worse in others.

    Might as well buy a $170 8GB RX 570 with some games bundle to get better performance, twice the memory, less money, and some games in the process.
    Well, nobody buys a workstation GPU like this for the sake of gaming. What you're paying for is better reliability, better customer support, and in this case, 4x display connectors in pretty much the smallest form factor a GPU can get. It's meant for a multi-monitor office PC. I'm not sure you can get a single-slot low-profile RX 570, regardless of the amount of display outputs it supports.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kayote
    replied
    Originally posted by bridgman View Post
    560 (Baffin) die has 16 CU's, 550 (Lexa) die has 10 IIRC. The board you linked appears to have 8 CU's enabled.

    Still, good to know there is a single-slot consumer Polaris out there... hadn't realized that, thanks !
    there are some 560 that come with 14 CU enabled some with even less, a bios mod can fix this. Maybe this also can be bios modded??

    Leave a comment:


  • buzzrobot
    replied
    I have a couple big boxes sitting around, with expensive high-end toys inside. My interest in games has withered away and I'm not a "creator" so it's all overkill. Next machine I build will be small and quiet. A 6.6-inch $199 card would interest me.

    Leave a comment:


  • bridgman
    replied
    560 (Baffin) die has 16 CU's, 550 (Lexa) die has 10 IIRC. The board you linked appears to have 8 CU's enabled.

    Still, good to know there is a single-slot consumer Polaris out there... hadn't realized that, thanks !

    Leave a comment:

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