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DisplayPort 2.0 Published For 3x Increase In Data Bandwidth Performance

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  • #21
    Originally posted by dragorth View Post

    That and the form factor of DP makes it the port Nvidia uses on its professional GPUs, so it can fit 4 DP ports per slot. DP sets the standards, and HDMI usually follows on their heels, so DP had 4K 60P for a year or so before HDMI could do it. HDMI just got 8K support, and DP is now talking about greater than 8K support. DP is really about the Professional market, which is ironic it comes from AMD.
    I have my laptop hooked up to my monitor over DP, and a SNES mini hooked up over HDMI. It pretty much sums up what each port was made for. Too bad laptop manufacturers these days are migrating over to HDMI even if a given series used to stick with "serious" DP back in the day (I'm thinking about you, Lenovo with your quest to ruin the ThinkPad brand).

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    • #22
      Originally posted by milkylainen View Post
      Oh please. Can't we just have one transmission protocol for everything now please?
      I know of the attempts, but it is still very much divergent.
      Each contemporary generation of all these protocols all use the same base SerDes available on the ASIC market for transmission anyway.
      "Let's just choose one solid standard and stick with it for a reasonable time." - said no consumer-product designer ever. :-(

      By my (limited) understanding of the protocols, the major technical difference between DP and HDMI is that the former uses a packet-based data protocol which makes feeding multiple streams of audio, video, even potentially network, down the one cable much simpler (at the expense of a more complex protocol and its silicon implementation), including the ability to send data for multiple devices, allowing chaining of monitors. HDMI, alternatively, simply blits out a rectangular pixel-map (basically digital VGA) with audio interleaved in, much simpler to implement at the expense of less functionality. Also, mechanically, DP connectors (full-size ones only :-/ ) also have locking teeth to keep them securely in the socket.

      I would love to normalise on DP at work but too much of our gear (TVs and Projectors) are HDMI only: chaining of displays would be very useful in particular.
      Meanwhile, at home I do run on DP but don't ever expect to actually need any of the extra features it has over HDMI :-/

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      • #23
        Originally posted by milkylainen View Post
        Oh please. Can't we just have one transmission protocol for everything now please?
        I know of the attempts, but it is still very much divergent.
        Each contemporary generation of all these protocols all use the same base SerDes available on the ASIC market for transmission anyway.
        If there was pretty much anything that only had 1 of something then maybe I'd agree, but we don't,

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        • #24
          Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
          If that's true, then it isn't DVI. DVI is a published standard, and it doesn't include audio, period. What you're describing is some proprietary nVidia thing that just happens to utilize the DVI connector.

          To make an analogy, if I hack together a way to attach a printer to my PC, using USB protocol, over an HDMI cable, that doesn't mean "HDMI supports printers".
          Except HDMI is a direct evolution of DVI that's compatible at an electrical and protocol level, just with a smaller connector and extra features. Ever since GPUs have supported HDMI audio it's worked over a DVI connector when the board manufacturer has chosen to use one, because it's the exact same pins coming out of the GPU that you'd use for an HDMI connector. It's not some weird nvidia thing.

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          • #25
            There are differences, but typically they are invisible to the end user. Most GPUs have only 1 or 2 HDMI connectors and the rest are DisplayPort connectors. Then there is HDCP support. HDMI always supports HDCP as it is used commonly for devices that display movies or TV shows. IIRC DVI never supported HDCP and DisplayPort lagged behind HDMI when it came to HDCP 2.2 support, which is required for 4k (and maybe even some non-4k) protected content. To this day most non-4k monitors that support DisplayPort implement only version 1.2, which does not have HDCP 2.2 support. There are some 4k monitors that only implement DP 1.2, but have HDMI 2.0, which means to play back certain protected content, you have to use the HDMI support. When you shop for monitors, always make sure you look at the specs for the monitor and ensure it's at least DP 1.3 if it's 4k (usually it'll be 1.4a). You also need to ensure you use suitable cables if you are driving 4k as older DisplayPort and some older HDMI cables cannot do 4k.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by SyXbiT View Post
              Are there pros/cons that make one better suited to TV or Monitor, or do we have two similar standards just for historical reasons?
              yes. hdmi is developed by consumer electronics vendors, vesa is computer videocard/monitor vendors

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              • #27
                That's nice,

                Bit of a shame that GPU and Display technology has not really progress that much, especially in respects to affordability, even the ultra expensive 2080TI can't really take advantage of this kind of bandwidth, and I have yet to see a flood of cheap and good 120hz HDR 4k screens on ebay like the good old golden age when 4k60hz screens were everywhere for a while for great prices. (only a few basic Korean brands left now, there use to be hundreds of them!)

                Maybe one day.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post

                  HDMI, which replaced component (Y Pb Pr) video, is for consumer living room devices.
                  Replaced SCART and S-Video, you mean?

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                  • #29
                    We can barely get support for DP 1.3 let alone 1.4..

                    I hope USB 4 (C) will include DP 2.0, and make it a minimum for a new logo indicating DP capability.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                      Well said brother, I propose the industry standardize on a single connector for all digital communications, regardless of type or purpose. The one connector to rule them all, shall be the 50 pin Centronics. WHO'S WITH ME?!
                      Haha, please not that one or ATA-Cables! But seriously, what is wrong with a single device-to-display connector? That role could be well defined after all and HDMI and DisplayPort converging here on a single connector would surely simplify the life of vendors and consumers alike. You don't have to overload it with functionality though, there is USB 4 for that.
                      Last edited by ms178; 06-27-2019, 09:50 AM.

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