Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

XGI Display Driver Finally On The Linux Kernel Chopping Block

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Adarion View Post
    Still it sucks that there is HW without Linux/FOSS support at all.
    This is eventually going to be fixed by not having access to XGI hardware anymore, in less than 5 years when even the servers from clearances won't be on sale.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by hax0r View Post
    I always hate to see support being removed for any device (old, unmaintained, unpopular etc) from Linux xorg gcc or just about any foss software, I would like to see this stuff sticking around forever.
    The hardware this driver kinda supported is not really around anymore, and what little is left is fading into obscurity pretty fast. You can't compare it to losing general-purpose software or tools that would run on any PC.

    They could demote the driver/code to staging folder within Linux source code, couldn't they? They don't have to throw it out? At least git keeps history of code, so there's possibility of reviving it later.
    They delete it exactly because there is git history and someone can go fetch it from there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adarion
    replied
    > Given there is someone

    That someone is called Kevin Brace.
    https://bracecomputerlab.com/

    And my first thought was if he might jump into the gap, but he's got enough projects already. And he's working single-handedly (TM) on openchrome, the old ATI driver and whatnot.

    I usually feel pity if a driver leaves but in this case... XGI never really took off, I remember the early days and it was even more painful than VIA. Sadly some of those chips were soldered to mainboards of servers and a couple of laptops. And iirc. Michael tested the blob and was horrified. These chips never ran much better than a VESA driver anyway, so there is not much lost if that driver vanishes.

    With the lack of documentation, XGI out of business for long and these chips slowly vanishing from the face of earth it is questionable if somebody will ever try to reverse engineer something here. It's a lot of work and success might not be all that great.
    Still it sucks that there is HW without Linux/FOSS support at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • hax0r
    replied
    I always hate to see support being removed for any device (old, unmaintained, unpopular etc) from Linux xorg gcc or just about any foss software, I would like to see this stuff sticking around forever. They could demote the driver/code to staging folder within Linux source code, couldn't they? They don't have to throw it out? At least git keeps history of code, so there's possibility of reviving it later.

    Leave a comment:


  • cb88
    replied
    Originally posted by zekesonxx View Post
    While I'm sad to see Linux lose support for something, and would rather see a DRM-based driver get added for them, I'm not too concerned.

    I suspect that any machine with one of these cards, that's still running, is A. horribly power inefficient and B. unlikely to update the kernel anywhere near something current.
    I've actually argued that with a coworker at one point about his home NAS... well I had a wall meter and let him borrow it turns out it wasn't nearly the hog he thought. Idle power consumption hasn't changed that much over the years, if the machine is fast enough to do the job... then it doesn't really need to be upgraded.

    Leave a comment:


  • zekesonxx
    replied
    While I'm sad to see Linux lose support for something, and would rather see a DRM-based driver get added for them, I'm not too concerned.

    I suspect that any machine with one of these cards, that's still running, is A. horribly power inefficient and B. unlikely to update the kernel anywhere near something current.

    Leave a comment:


  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by cb88 View Post
    Well... its was really common in servers, and considering there is probably alot of Core 2 Quad era server's out there running.....
    I don't see that much servers from 2008-ish anymore. They are mostly decommissioned and on sale.

    Overall, I'm seeing servers have around a decade of service life, once they are past that they are replaced. The ones that aren't usually don't receive any update at all anyway (they are left as-is after they were first installed until they break).

    Guess what? We are talking of machines that have around 10 years of service.

    That said, I'm sure that server distros that care can keep this driver in their own kernel patches.

    Leave a comment:


  • devsk
    replied
    Originally posted by cb88 View Post

    Well... its was really common in servers, and considering there is probably alot of Core 2 Quad era server's out there running.....
    Not many of them will upgrade to 5.1 kernel though...:-) So, this is all moot

    Leave a comment:


  • cb88
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Afaik the only ones that might matter are the ones embedded in older server boards where they are used by the IPMI (lights-out management) to redirect the screen over internet.

    Anything else is pretty much obsolete, but I'm sure that all 10-20 users worldwide will come here in this thread to whine and complain.
    Well... its was really common in servers, and considering there is probably alot of Core 2 Quad era server's out there running.....

    Leave a comment:


  • rooted
    replied
    I guess, but hardware is heavily recycled/repurposed in less fortunate countries so I'm guessing there will be more than 10-20 users.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X