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Initial Tests: Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu With NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 / GTX 1080 Ti / RTX 2080 Ti

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  • Scellow
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael View Post

    Both systems are the same...?
    Ram: 2x8gb ram vs 16gb
    Driver: 411.63 vs 410.57

    That's not the same

    Leave a comment:


  • CFWhitman
    replied
    Originally posted by rabcor View Post

    It's time to admit that high stability at the price of massively outdated software, is a niche solution, and too high a price to pay for most modern PC users.
    Most PC users are not hardcore gamers. A lot are not even casual gamers.

    One of the biggest issues I have with the people for whom I've provided a Linux installation is getting them to let me update their *buntu LTS distribution before it goes out of support and stops receiving security updates after four or five years. These people don't tend to do any serious gaming. Most people don't want to change anything unless they have a problem.

    Casual gamers are often content with the latest LTS release of Ubuntu, as long as they don't have hardware that is too new for it to be supported.

    Hardcore gamers are the most likely to update everything to the latest release or be on a rolling distribution. Hardcore Linux gamers are not a common thing.

    I sometimes maintain a rolling distribution somewhere, but I'm usually too lazy to bother. The most likely reason for me to upgrade further than the most recent LTS is because my hardware is too new for it to be supported, or supported well, by that distribution.

    Leave a comment:


  • Weasel
    replied
    Originally posted by rabcor View Post
    Also, why ubuntu? why not something faster? Manjaro is real popular these days...
    Except it's not.

    Originally posted by rabcor View Post
    Yes, we are, and we should have already more than a decade ago. It might not fully apply for some applications that demand utmost stability, such as servers (keyword being might)
    Ah here come the rolling release advocates who think their minority point of view is the majority.

    Originally posted by rabcor View Post
    But for consumers, and even most professional applications, lagging behind a whole fucking year on releases? That's just not ok for most people, it doesn't happen on macs, it doesn't happen on windows, it only happens here
    It's exactly the opposite. Rolling releases are not ok for most people. Where the fuck do you pull this kind of shit from? They have always been in the minority.

    And yes it fucking happens on Windows, at least before W10, and guess which Windows version is still old as hell and 20 times more popular than Linux. The preferences are obvious. That's how much people hate rolling releases ("software as a service") and other crap W10 brought. Most are just forced to use in Windows land.

    You can't make this stuff up. Statistics speak for themselves.

    Rolling releases are stupid and only a minority of users like it (they're made, like most shit, to make life easier on the devs/maintainers, but NO USER GIVES A SHIT OF THAT). Get over it.

    Leave a comment:


  • mao_dze_dun
    replied
    Originally posted by cybertraveler View Post

    I don't know many GNU/Linux, but the ones I do know don't spend time upgrading their OS to have a newer kernel & mesa. It's often a time consuming, risky & error prone affair. If you think about the typical Windows gamer and their general level of technical competence, you might agree with me that it's a bad idea suggesting to the average person that they should attempt to upgrade their kernel using unofficial sources: not on a machine that they need anyway. Most Windows gamers I know tend to only have one computer that they use for gaming, work and everything.

    Note: I expect these people would upgrade their proprietary NVIDIA drivers and they would upgrade their distro from time to time. This is compatible with what I originally said though.

    I maintain: the system that Michael tested is very realistically typical of what GNU/Linux gamers would be using. It's a fair test.
    This. Though I admit I'd be interested in seeing a comparison of Proton with the latest DXVK (you can manually replace to the latest version) + latest Nvidia Vulkan driver, compared to Windows.

    Leave a comment:


  • cybertraveler
    replied
    Originally posted by Aiua View Post
    I'd think a lot of linux gamers, at least those interested in benchmarks, would be on recent kernel & drivers.
    I mean, I'm pretty sure Michael uses up-to-date drivers for Windows.
    I don't know many GNU/Linux, but the ones I do know don't spend time upgrading their OS to have a newer kernel & mesa. It's often a time consuming, risky & error prone affair. If you think about the typical Windows gamer and their general level of technical competence, you might agree with me that it's a bad idea suggesting to the average person that they should attempt to upgrade their kernel using unofficial sources: not on a machine that they need anyway. Most Windows gamers I know tend to only have one computer that they use for gaming, work and everything.

    Note: I expect these people would upgrade their proprietary NVIDIA drivers and they would upgrade their distro from time to time. This is compatible with what I originally said though.

    I maintain: the system that Michael tested is very realistically typical of what GNU/Linux gamers would be using. It's a fair test.

    Leave a comment:


  • mitcoes
    replied
    Thanks a lot for this tests.
    I would love to read WINE staging - and Proton - game tests too as this GPU are gaming ones.
    Doom16 Opengl and Vulkan MS WOS vs Wine Stage vs Proton 720p (~1k) 1080p (~2k) and 4k

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael
    replied
    Originally posted by Scellow View Post
    What's the point of this "benchmark" both machines are different
    Both systems are the same...?

    Leave a comment:


  • rabcor
    replied
    Originally posted by johanb View Post
    That kernel is not even a year old, are we seriously going to start considering every distro which is not a rolling release distro to not have new enough packages?
    Yes, we are, and we should have already more than a decade ago. It might not fully apply for some applications that demand utmost stability, such as servers (keyword being might)

    But for consumers, and even most professional applications, lagging behind a whole fucking year on releases? That's just not ok for most people, it doesn't happen on macs, it doesn't happen on windows, it only happens here, and nobody who has used anything else over the past years, is ok with it, if they tell themselves they're ok with it they're only lying to themselves. We need to start setting higher standards over here, it doesn't have to be a choice between being a year behind on releases for every single god damn program with good stability or rolling release with bad stability.

    Because you can have rolling release with just as good stability as these 'lagging a year behind' distros. I've spent most of my time on arch linux, and whenever I've tried something else, my problems (stability related and otherwise) only increased, contrary to expectation. Now arch isn't exactly a beacon of stability perhaps because it requires users to manually make some changes to their system to avoid breakage with every tenth major update (or something like that, it happens but usually with a few months between). But Manjaro on the other hand tries to fix that issue, and it's mostly successful at it. Rolling release is the only thing a lot of people are willing to accept, and distros that don't deliver it are doomed to eventually fail as more distros that do come out.

    Even if we only have an outdated kernel, the likelihood of issues with more recent hardware significantly increases compared to rolling releases.

    It's time to admit that high stability at the price of massively outdated software, is a niche solution, and too high a price to pay for most modern PC users.
    Last edited by rabcor; 09-27-2018, 02:33 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • johanb
    replied
    Originally posted by Aiua View Post
    I'd think a lot of linux gamers, at least those interested in benchmarks, would be on recent kernel & drivers.
    I mean, I'm pretty sure Michael uses up-to-date drivers for Windows.
    There are usually other article testing git master of mesa and the kernel.

    That kernel is not even a year old, are we seriously going to start considering every distro which is not a rolling release distro to not have new enough packages?

    18.04 is a great example IMO for something rather recent which the mainstream most likely is using.
    You don't see michael using the pre-release windows builds either, so it just seems fair.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scellow
    replied
    What's the point of this "benchmark" both machines are different

    Leave a comment:

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