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Ryzen 5 2400G Radeon Vega Linux OpenGL/Vulkan Gaming Benchmarks

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  • #51
    Originally posted by BillBroadley View Post
    I'm very interesting in linux stability of the new Ryzen 5 2400G.

    I'm just hoping for things like full screen video playback (netflix, vlc, and mplayer), heavy use of tabs (firefox or chrome), tons of terminals, occasional light gaming, and related use cases to not crash, corrupt the text console, leave pixel droppings, or the dreaded failure to map where all new windows are black. My last Radeon was quite the disappointment.
    Interesting. I have an Radeon HD 5770 (ancient), an RX-480, and for a year or so an R9 270. The R9 270 sucked... but after I had all sorts of odd bugs in three Linux distributions and two different Windows installations across two motherboards I figured out that the card had hardware problems. Replaced it with the RX 480, no headaches.

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    • #52
      Michael Nice review! It would have been nice to see some more demanding games like Deus Ex:MD to see what is playable and what is not.

      Originally posted by dungeon View Post
      These 24 CUs alone on mobile Vega (so even if you forget additional HBM size) is impossible to be in an Ryzen APU... but as you see 11 CUs like on this one could be packed.

      On Playstation 4 PRO APU, much bigger gfx could be packed thanks to the small size of Cat CPU architecture so Jaguar CPUs size and also that GDDR5 memory is elsewhere
      I don't think that is true. Raven Ridge is 210 mm2 (on GloFo 14FF) while PS4 Pro APU is 325 mm2 (on TSMC 16FF). Each of the 40 CUs on PS4 Pro is supposedly 3.52 mm2 so AMD could have added many CUs to Raven Ridge without surpassing PS4 Pro APU in die size.

      I think the reason why AMD stopped short of adding more CUs is that the memory bandwidth just isn't there to feed them.

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      • #53
        Originally posted by chithanh View Post
        Michael Nice review! It would have been nice to see some more demanding games like Deus Ex:MD to see what is playable and what is not.

        I don't think that is true. Raven Ridge is 210 mm2 (on GloFo 14FF) while PS4 Pro APU is 325 mm2 (on TSMC 16FF). Each of the 40 CUs on PS4 Pro is supposedly 3.52 mm2 so AMD could have added many CUs to Raven Ridge without surpassing PS4 Pro APU in die size.

        I think the reason why AMD stopped short of adding more CUs is that the memory bandwidth just isn't there to feed them.
        In a future article when just looking at Raven Ridge alone without Kaveri or Intel graphics but comparing to dGPUs will be more demanding games.
        Michael Larabel
        http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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        • #54
          Michael have you ever tried
          echo high > /sys/class/drm/card0/device/power_dpm_force_performance_level I get quite a boost in almost all game, sometimes as high as 20-30%, in some games, especially war thunder. Some games it makes no difference. With my RX 480. Yes I understand this is not ideal to leave on. But the performance improvement can be quite high. I supposed there is still frequency scaling issues with the opensource drivers.
          Last edited by monte84; 02-14-2018, 10:48 AM.

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          • #55
            Originally posted by chithanh View Post
            [USER="1"]
            I don't think that is true. Raven Ridge is 210 mm2 (on GloFo 14FF) while PS4 Pro APU is 325 mm2 (on TSMC 16FF). Each of the 40 CUs on PS4 Pro is supposedly 3.52 mm2 so AMD could have added many CUs to Raven Ridge without surpassing PS4 Pro APU in die size.

            I think the reason why AMD stopped short of adding more CUs is that the memory bandwidth just isn't there to feed them.
            Well that is true but any truth have two sides, as if you need to fit into AM4 and to have that 45/65W cTDP then adding more CUs is impossible (there will be GE models of these with fixed 35W even) 24CUs and HBM probably is alone about 50W (it is also lower clocked one since it mobile, but not sure in that one that might spike at even more Watts) already and where is CPU and other blocks in the story, so nope it can't be done that would be TDP of 100+ Watts
            Last edited by dungeon; 02-14-2018, 11:24 AM.

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            • #56
              Perhaps the forthcoming die shrink will allow them to pack more in. Although heat dissipation over a small area of the die may just become the concern!

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              • #57
                To stay with same thermals, they might pack more only when they go to lower nm process... initial Playstation 4 had about 250 max power rating (that one done on 28 nm), later one Playstation Slim was at 16 nm and max power rate there was 165W. So question is always what to do with that 30-40%ish, should we stay down or to pack or to fire up something more

                Real max power used by console observed was also about 40% lower... so there is OC potentional there too

                That is the story even with these PC APUs, these could go theretically plus/minus 40% up or down... but is usually released to mainstream as optimal right between these two extremes, otherwise it would be some fixed special
                Last edited by dungeon; 02-14-2018, 12:25 PM.

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                • #58
                  Originally posted by ElectricPrism View Post
                  I prefer thin cases that are as minimal as possible.

                  I am working on a new case about the same height and width of a a Xbox One S except with a slightly longer depth with a full dGPU. 2.5".

                  I basically have 3 options -- I can go buy a PicoPSU and do a AMD Ryzen 2400g build say with a NFC S4 Mini -- do a Dr Zaber Sentry although the costs is $360 to send to the states and I'm not 100% sure the dimensions are as small as they could be since my case is about 7.1 Liters of volume and IIRC it is a bit more than that.
                  Yeah I'm tempted to do the same sort of thing, maybe as a mobile gaming system. The problem really comes down to me not having a need for a system like this.

                  Just something to point out though, there are PicoPSUs (or devices like them) that go up to 250W, and aren't very expensive. You can build something powerful and tiny for very little money.

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                  • #59
                    Originally posted by grok View Post

                    You likely need a Displayport to HDMI 2.0 converter, which a nice motherboard can discreetly include on-board in theory - if none does then get an external one.
                    BUT there are a lot of "HDMI 4K" converters which of course are useless (yet another HDMI 1.4!)

                    So you can't go to any store ; web-search for a "real" one, fully explicit e.g. like this :
                    "Supports UHD Resolutions up to 3840x2160p at 60Hz with 24 bit color and 4:4:4 color sampling"

                    (That or a geforce GT1030 would work with your Kabini if it fits in the case, but the CPU will still be slow)
                    I'll be waiting for something native, not wanting to use nVidia or a discreet card, Raven Ridge sounds perfect for my needs, just want it in the smallest form factor possible

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                    • #60
                      Originally posted by dungeon View Post
                      if you need to fit into AM4 and to have that 45/65W cTDP then adding more CUs is impossible
                      The 2400G consumes around 50 W in real-world gaming according to Tomshardware. This means about 30% more headroom to stay inside 65 W TDP, and power consumption can be almost doubled and still stay inside the 95 W limit of the AM4 socket.

                      Then the cooling is not optimal yet. For Raven Ridge, AMD chose to use thermal paste instead of soldering the heatspreader to the die, as this is cheaper.

                      On the other hand, Raven Ridge massively benefits from DDR4-3200 memory compared to slower RAM, but doesn't benefit much past that. So for a hypothetical Vega20 APU, either we need DDR4-6000 which doesn't exist yet (only up to DDR4-4600 is currently available in the market), or some kind of fast cache needs to be placed on the package or mobo.

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