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Thunderbolt Networking Driver Lands In Linux 4.15

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  • microcode
    replied
    Originally posted by TheLexMachine View Post
    ...but we still need reliable controllers for devices, which are in dire need of refinement and improvements.
    Which is why it becoming royalty free in the coming months is such a big deal. It means that QCOM, NXP, TI, Atmel, Microchip, or somebody else can come along and either put it into a microcontroller or make a good highly-integrated separately packaged controller (with all the power and analog electrics figured out) without being concerned about protocol level royalties.

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  • TheLexMachine
    replied
    Originally posted by microcode View Post

    Man, that is a huge deal. Means that fully-functioning TB3 ports (USB-C, USB 3.x signalling, DisplayPort signalling, and Thunderbolt signalling) can function with entirely royalty free protocols.
    You say it like it's a good thing. But then, you look at the state of the actual controllers, which isn't great. Intel is moving the controller for the PC inside their future CPUs, but we still need reliable controllers for devices, which are in dire need of refinement and improvements. We also need things like HBM to be integrated into the chips, to provide significant performance increases for big data taskss like multi-gigabit networking, which is what HBM was originally intended to be used for. That won't come for a long time. We also don't know how many CPUs Intel will fit with Thunderbolt, as it may be a few or it may be many, and it may take several years for them to move to many. It may not even hit the budget chips until after 2020.

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  • zamadatix
    replied
    Originally posted by FireBurn View Post
    Just to check, does that mean you could connect two computers up with a USB-C cable and transfer files at superfast speeds if they're both thunderbolt enabled?
    Well, a Thunderbolt cable yes. Not all USB-C cables can carry Thunderbolt.

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  • FireBurn
    replied
    Just to check, does that mean you could connect two computers up with a USB-C cable and transfer files at superfast speeds if they're both thunderbolt enabled?

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  • zamadatix
    replied
    ThunderboltIP, another tool that delivers Ethernet but calls it something else.

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  • GruenSein
    replied
    Is this just point to point are there such things as "thunderbolt switches"?

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  • microcode
    replied
    This should be a great help for docks: have the dock export the DisplayPorts, an Ethernet NIC abstracted as ThunderboltIP (so completely portable, no new drivers need to be distributed), a USB hub, and full charging power over one USB-C connector.

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  • microcode
    replied
    Originally posted by Marc Driftmeyer View Post
    Thunderbolt becomes royalty free this January.
    Man, that is a huge deal. Means that fully-functioning TB3 ports (USB-C, USB 3.x signalling, DisplayPort signalling, and Thunderbolt signalling) can function with entirely royalty free protocols.

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  • Marc Driftmeyer
    replied
    Originally posted by arbition View Post
    Even though thunderbolt is expensive, this is probably still cheaper than a 10gig card and SFP+ Direct Attach Cables.
    Thunderbolt becomes royalty free this January.

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  • arbition
    replied
    Even though thunderbolt is expensive, this is probably still cheaper than a 10gig card and SFP+ Direct Attach Cables.

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