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Corsair Force MP500 240GB M.2 SSD On Linux

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  • Corsair Force MP500 240GB M.2 SSD On Linux

    Phoronix: Corsair Force MP500 240GB M.2 SSD On Linux

    I picked up a Corsair Force MP500 NVMe M.2 solid-state drive for one of the new test systems in the Phoronix lab and so I ran some benchmarks on this high-performance drive compared to a few other SSDs.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=24787

  • #2
    Originally posted by tildearrow
    Typo:
    Please, pretty please with sugar on top: send all these corrections in PM, they're not general interest informations. Thank you.

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    • #3
      Amazing to see how SSDs keep making progress.

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      • #4
        I wish I could see this NVMe SSD tested on a Ryzen system to see if NVMe performance differs between AMD and Intel implementations.

        I mean with hard disks, SATA is quite obviously the bottleneck, so CPU/Mobo/controller probably has plrenty of performance reserve and won't influence performance much.

        But with NVMe SSDs- we might be pushing some boundaries and hitting bottlenecks.

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        • #5
          Wow, I came into this article thinking it'll probably be alright, but the Samsung will be a clear winner. But it blows the Samsung drive away in the majority of tests. Very good to see, hopefully competition will bring the price down on these nvme drives.

          I put the SM951 128gb in a cheap dual core PC I built for family recently and it blows away my quad core system with a regular sata ssd every time I come to update Arch. I'm always surprised at the difference and these drives are clearly a step above the SM951. Will have to get one for my next build!

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          • #6
            I am curious if this is just a Linux thing. Does the 950 Pro run better in Windows making the Corsair better only in Linux? Either way, this is on my radar as an option for my new Ryzen system as this thing is far cheaper than the 950 Pro, but still a solid performer.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by audi.rs4 View Post
              I am curious if this is just a Linux thing. Does the 950 Pro run better in Windows making the Corsair better only in Linux? Either way, this is on my radar as an option for my new Ryzen system as this thing is far cheaper than the 950 Pro, but still a solid performer.
              960 EVO is the thing most people buy these days. 950 is obsolete as much as this benchmark is misleading.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by caligula View Post
                960 EVO is the thing most people buy these days. 950 is obsolete as much as this benchmark is misleading.
                The Samsung 960 is newer then 950, yes, but most retailers are still carrying the 950 alongside it as a lower cost option. I wouldn't call the 950 "obsolete". After all, it's not like Skylake CPU's are instantly "obsolete" the day Kaby Lake hits the shelves.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post

                  The Samsung 960 is newer then 950, yes, but most retailers are still carrying the 950 alongside it as a lower cost option. I wouldn't call the 950 "obsolete". After all, it's not like Skylake CPU's are instantly "obsolete" the day Kaby Lake hits the shelves.
                  Agreed. I'll tell you what's obsolete. My 5200 RPM laptop and 7200 RPM desktop drive. The 950 would make quite the nice upgrade in either one.

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                  • #10
                    Sad that Corsair forces you to use Windows or a WIndows PE usb to update their SSD firmware. Same with Samsung (non-enterprise drives at least).

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