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Intel 600P Series SSD NVMe M.2 Linux Tests

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  • Intel 600P Series SSD NVMe M.2 Linux Tests

    Phoronix: Intel 600P Series SSD NVMe M.2 Linux Tests

    Last month Intel introduced the 600P Series solid-state drives as the most competitively-priced NVMe SSDs launched to date. Here are a few Linux comparison benchmarks from my initial testing of the SSDPEKKW256G7X1 M.2 SSD on Linux.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=23541

  • #2
    What about power saving states with NVMe SSD and Skylake on Laptops?
    Is is possible to go further than PC3 now?

    https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/41713.html

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    • #3
      I miss the SM961 from that list...

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      • #4
        in the grahps there is a small typo: ocz triton, its trion

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        • #5
          Originally posted by anarki2 View Post
          I miss the SM961 from that list...
          You probably did since it's not out yet and nobody seems to have sent Michael an early review unit...

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          • #6
            It is nothing short of amazing some of those tests actually make it look good. The 950 pro beats it in every metric...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ddriver View Post
              It is nothing short of amazing some of those tests actually make it look good. The 950 pro beats it in every metric...
              It is a good drive and the 950 pro ought to be beating it considering the price delta. The 600P is only a minimal markup over a regular SATA drive for the same capacity.

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              • #8
                NVMe SSD's don't do well with small K database read/write cycles. We saw this on the first Intel 750's and on the Samsung 950 Pro. FusionIO has a special cache engine to help overcome that 4k drawback, but you also spend huge bucks on their SSA's. But you have to keep it in perspective. Most people looking to do SSD based databases will probably use either SATA based SSD arrays to break up those 4k limitations. I have yet to see a full NVMe drive array in production with RAID as there are so few planars that support the number of PCIe lanes required without using arbitration.

                At the moment we don't recommend anyone use NVMe storage for production databases that require high levels of resiliency.

                Since I went to NVMe (I use the Samsung 950 Pro's), I have almost retired my mSATA based SSD's.

                When I was helping someone with their hard drive based i7 computer, I was getting irritated with the response times. NVMe can spoil you.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by chuckula View Post

                  It is a good drive and the 950 pro ought to be beating it considering the price delta. The 600P is only a minimal markup over a regular SATA drive for the same capacity.
                  Hmm, at my local retailer there is 10$ difference between the 600p and the sm951 which also trashes it even if a tad slower than the 950 pro. And it is not a good drive, it is runt of nvme, writing is barely faster than SATA and only until the SLC buffers fill up, afterwards it becomes slower than a mechanical HDD, and endurance is abysmal too, and knowing intel's previous practices, once the TBW counter runs out you will be locked out of your data. And it is not "only a minimal markup" - it is 66% more expensive than identical capacity SATA SSD.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ddriver View Post

                    Hmm, at my local retailer there is 10$ difference between the 600p and the sm951 which also trashes it even if a tad slower than the 950 pro. And it is not a good drive, it is runt of nvme, writing is barely faster than SATA and only until the SLC buffers fill up, afterwards it becomes slower than a mechanical HDD, and endurance is abysmal too, and knowing intel's previous practices, once the TBW counter runs out you will be locked out of your data. And it is not "only a minimal markup" - it is 66% more expensive than identical capacity SATA SSD.

                    Stop spreading outright lies because you are some sort of fanboy tool with bigoted axe to grind against the single largest contributor to the Linux kernel.

                    $10 difference? If by 10 you mean $180 then yeah, it's $10.

                    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...5852-_-Product

                    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-412-_-Product

                    I posted factual information.
                    You posted lies and misinformation.
                    STFU.

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