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Kingston HyperX Predator M.2 SSD On Ubuntu: Linux Might Have Problems With It

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  • Kingston HyperX Predator M.2 SSD On Ubuntu: Linux Might Have Problems With It

    Phoronix: Kingston HyperX Predator M.2 SSD On Ubuntu: Linux Might Have Problems With It

    While recently I've posted a number of Linux solid-state drive benchmarks from low-end SATA 3.0 SSDs being used in Linux test systems not frequently being stressed by disk/file-system workloads, here are some benchmark results using a higher-end M.2 SSD. Benchmark results today are from the Kingston HyperX Predator 240GB M.2 Gen2 x4.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=22184

  • #2
    maybe it was using sata interface instead of nvme?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pal666 View Post
      maybe it was using sata interface instead of nvme?
      I think this will be the problem. Looks to me like it's running in SATA/AHCI emulation (legacy) mode. There's no reason at all why it will operate with decent performance in legacy mode. It's only really there for boot-time access.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by s_j_newbury View Post
        I think this will be the problem. Looks to me like it's running in SATA/AHCI emulation (legacy) mode. There's no reason at all why it will operate with decent performance in legacy mode. It's only really there for boot-time access.
        NVMe capable drives are still quite rare(I think the Samsung 950 Pro might actually be the first consumer targeted NVMe drive). This particular Kingston drive is PCIE x2 + AHCI according to the web

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        • #5
          It will be nice to add a Samssung SSD benchmark result since Samsung has a very good reputation. It will be interesting to see how Samsung compares to the other SSDs you have tested.

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          • #6
            Must be running in AHCI mode instead of NVMe. If the disk is named dev/sdX its not running under the NVMe driver. M2 is just a glorified pcie 4x 3.0 slot.

            Is the disk capable of NVMe at all?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Raven3x7 View Post
              This particular Kingston drive is PCIE x2 + AHCI according to the web
              The drive should be pcie 2.0 x4. The motherboard, however, only offers pcie 2.0 2x to its m.2 slot. Albeit that should still be faster than sata ssd. Of course though with such a configuration you can forget the 1400MB/s advertized max read rate, more like 750MB/s, sata 3.0 should achieve something like 500MB/s.
              (Unless you'd use the wrong m.2 slot of the motherboard as it has two - the other one is single lane pcie 2.0, if that would even fit as this one is intended for wifi cards.)

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              • #8
                I have had similar issues to the ones described in the article, although I have the HHHL PCIe version (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820104544). I was planning to use it as the main boot drive for my new server build with CentOS 7, but it had recurring issues recognizing the device at boot. I wondered if a newer kernel would help, so I tried using Fedora 22 instead, but I still experienced the same issues. Often the installation from a USB drive will succeed, but then at first boot it will fail to recognize the device.

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                • #9
                  In theory the M.2 ports of latest Skylake boards should be the fastest ones. Maybe there is a firmware update for the drive to fix some issues.

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                  • #10
                    Would be interested to see the kernel log, at least the part where it detects the drive (or the full log up until login).

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