Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PNY CS1211 120GB SSD Tests On Linux

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PNY CS1211 120GB SSD Tests On Linux

    Phoronix: PNY CS1211 120GB SSD Tests On Linux

    The PNY CS1211 120GB solid-state drive retails for under $60 USD and is one of this memory company's value SSD lines.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=22017

  • #2
    Prices dropped so fast in 1 year...

    I really wait the day when a 1TB SSD will cost less than 200$. Classical HDD are soon dead and buried!

    Comment


    • #3
      Might be a stupid question, but are the bigger capacity SSDs always faster than the smaller ones?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by marceel View Post
        Might be a stupid question, but are the bigger capacity SSDs always faster than the smaller ones?
        It's not stupid and I can't answer your question for all bigger drives but here is what I believe happens. Imagine you have one 60gb drive and then you add another identical 60gb drive to make it into a raid0 setup (where the computer would write half of the data to one drive and the other half to the other drive at the same time). Well, I believe this is exactly what happens with SSDs when they increase in size. They have more identical flash chips inside the drive and they are using those chips in a type of raid array. I could be completely wrong about this of course and, if so, I welcome others to correct me.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by acrazyplayer View Post

          It's not stupid and I can't answer your question for all bigger drives but here is what I believe happens. Imagine you have one 60gb drive and then you add another identical 60gb drive to make it into a raid0 setup (where the computer would write half of the data to one drive and the other half to the other drive at the same time). Well, I believe this is exactly what happens with SSDs when they increase in size. They have more identical flash chips inside the drive and they are using those chips in a type of raid array. I could be completely wrong about this of course and, if so, I welcome others to correct me.
          The way SSD's handle their internal allocations can be quite complicated, and I'm not sure RAID is a suitable analogy. It is probably better to think of the drive having more physical blocks rather than additional 'drives'.

          The performance for a large device will depend on the drive's firmware, how it manages its internal buss and addressing, and the speed of the components themselves. Probably the best answer to the question is "it depends" ?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Godzilla View Post

            The way SSD's handle their internal allocations can be quite complicated, and I'm not sure RAID is a suitable analogy. It is probably better to think of the drive having more physical blocks rather than additional 'drives'.

            The performance for a large device will depend on the drive's firmware, how it manages its internal buss and addressing, and the speed of the components themselves. Probably the best answer to the question is "it depends" ?
            Not necessarily such a bad comparison, since a larger drive *can* have more physical flash CHIPS. So if you are comparing a drive with X chips to one twice the size and having 2X of the same chips, then you can read/write faster as long as the controller can deal with them in parallel.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by droidhacker View Post

              Not necessarily such a bad comparison, since a larger drive *can* have more physical flash CHIPS. So if you are comparing a drive with X chips to one twice the size and having 2X of the same chips, then you can read/write faster as long as the controller can deal with them in parallel.
              It is not a bad comparison, no, but perhaps it is one of those times when a mental metaphor (here RAID) brings some misleading baggage along with it. For example, you are describing general parallel writes of arbitrary data, where as acrazyplayer seemed to be describing striping. These aren't exactly the same things.
              Last edited by Godzilla; 08-17-2015, 03:48 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Heads UP:
                If anyone is interested, PNY CS1211 240GB is on sale at Newegg for $60 until Jan 5, 2016 at 23:59 PST -or- until they sell out(likely). That's 25 cents/GB, BTW.
                Link http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820178938
                It is not 'the fastest' but is fast and from end user reports seems to be solid with very few DOA or 'it just (black) magically died last night' reports.
                I've been using PNY memory, ...etc. since the Pentium III 450 days ... I cannot speak directly to the SSD(s), yet, but PNY has always made good, solid electronics. No fluff - no BS to trick consumer, ...kinda like Linux, .

                Comment

                Working...
                X