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  • phoronix
    started a topic Canonical: Ubuntu To Soon Ship On 5% Of PCs

    Canonical: Ubuntu To Soon Ship On 5% Of PCs

    Phoronix: Canonical: Ubuntu To Soon Ship On 5% Of PCs

    Chris Kenyon, the VP of sales and business development for Canonical, just spoke this afternoon at the Ubuntu 12.10 Developer Summit about what Canonical does with OEMs and ODMs. He also tossed out some rather interesting numbers about the adoption of Ubuntu Linux...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTA5ODM

  • crazycheese
    replied
    Originally posted by allquixotic View Post
    It's exactly the sort of user like you who we don't want to lose.

    Those of us who have grown up with Linux and free software (or been using it for most of our adult lives) are not going to just give it up because we're angry about some silly technical feature. We might get hot under the collar, but we'll either fix the problem ourselves or we'll motivate others to help us fix it. But new users have the least loyalty to our platform and have the most to gain.

    While I can't promise the world to you, please let us know if you run into any problems while using your new operating system. You can post in this thread, or you might try ubuntuforums.org . I'm glad to hear that you aren't having any problems with it

    How do you find Unity? Is it intuitive or are you feeling lost with it?

    We love new users because you are the future of Ubuntu and the Free Software / Open Source movement in general. Give us your feedback and we'll actually listen and help you, unlike Microsoft which will just ignore you. Welcome to the fold!
    -b , mate!

    Leave a comment:


  • crazycheese
    replied
    Originally posted by woodfar View Post
    I am new here and there is a lot I don't understand. I have a Gateway laptop that I had a friend install Ubuntu on because of all the issues with Windows Vista. It is rather awkward for me to navigate because of being use to Windows all this time, but not giving up on Ubuntu because I like the idea of open source support. I use Firefox as my browser and never have any problems with it.
    You should try KDE4. It looks much more to windows(or windows - to it) , than Mate/Cinnamon/Unity - default DE of Ubuntu/Mint, which way more resemble MacOSX interface (again, questionable who is copying who).

    Leave a comment:


  • allquixotic
    replied
    Originally posted by woodfar View Post
    I am new here and there is a lot I don't understand. I have a Gateway laptop that I had a friend install Ubuntu on because of all the issues with Windows Vista. It is rather awkward for me to navigate because of being use to Windows all this time, but not giving up on Ubuntu because I like the idea of open source support. I use Firefox as my browser and never have any problems with it.
    It's exactly the sort of user like you who we don't want to lose.

    Those of us who have grown up with Linux and free software (or been using it for most of our adult lives) are not going to just give it up because we're angry about some silly technical feature. We might get hot under the collar, but we'll either fix the problem ourselves or we'll motivate others to help us fix it. But new users have the least loyalty to our platform and have the most to gain.

    While I can't promise the world to you, please let us know if you run into any problems while using your new operating system. You can post in this thread, or you might try ubuntuforums.org . I'm glad to hear that you aren't having any problems with it

    How do you find Unity? Is it intuitive or are you feeling lost with it?

    We love new users because you are the future of Ubuntu and the Free Software / Open Source movement in general. Give us your feedback and we'll actually listen and help you, unlike Microsoft which will just ignore you. Welcome to the fold!

    Leave a comment:


  • woodfar
    replied
    New user

    I am new here and there is a lot I don't understand. I have a Gateway laptop that I had a friend install Ubuntu on because of all the issues with Windows Vista. It is rather awkward for me to navigate because of being use to Windows all this time, but not giving up on Ubuntu because I like the idea of open source support. I use Firefox as my browser and never have any problems with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adarion
    replied
    They want to reach 5% with what? That Unity stuff? Dear God, please no. I love classic desktop, I want to WORK with a computer and not feel like being fooled or using a post stamp size touchscreen surface.
    Ubuntu is the most overhyped distribution ever.
    I wouldn't mind having it preloaded on a box, though. Cause that would mean no Microsoft or Apple tax, or indirect tax for Oracle, I could kick it and install something more useful.

    Leave a comment:


  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Originally posted by Kano View Post
    You can certainly flash more systems with Linux and flashrom than you might think. But compared to BIOS builtin or DOS flash tools no config data is kept. The most part is not that critical, but for example new asus systems use insyde uefi versions that store the mac adress there. If you know what you do you can use ethtool to restore the mac adress you want. But the general user should prefer using the official flash tools. For backup purpose flashrom however is great, it even stores the current settings of those uefi systems if you like that. More users should test it and report back to flashrom, the current default way to access the eeprom seems to be SPI and i think much more boards than the listed ones would work with it. If you have got a backup you can run fsdump.py to easyly identify raw parts with config settings. Also you can check 6 byts at 1000h offset for the mac adress of your first nic... I am definitely a fan of flashrom, i used it with older systems a lot to flash modified roms - added via raid rom, gpxe or ipxe rom instead of pxe rom, plop instead of pxe. i also flashed a 3com nic with ipxe and plop (you have to disable onboard nic but enable lan boot). It is a really great tool.

    http://flashrom.org/Supported_hardware
    Yeah. The problem is that this specific PC (or at least the closest to it, I don't recall the exact numbers of the model) is specifically listed as unsupported...

    Originally posted by unkilbeeg View Post
    I'm a little boggled by the notion of people buying preloaded Linux because it's cheaper.

    My experience has been that preloaded Windows is always cheaper because it comes along with a boatload (or should that be "bloatload"?) of bloatware. The vendors of the bloatware pay enough to the OEM to defray the cost of the Windows, to the point that the final cost to the buyer is lower than a Linux install with no bloatware.

    Now, maybe I've been looking at the wrong vendors, but the last time I looked at Dell, the equivalent Linux machine was always just a bit more expensive than that same Windows PC.
    I'm not sure about bloatware, but OEM Windows are generally pretty cheap. For one, MS doesn't want to lose any more of its market share, and giving out OEM Windows is one way to ensure that. Plus, more often than not, those Windows versions are the locked ones, including Starter, which encourages to spend more to unlock more features (and it always bothers me when you have to pay to unlock software that you already own...). Hence the cost of OEM Windows is close to none, at least talking about the more heavily locked Windows versions.

    Leave a comment:


  • unkilbeeg
    replied
    I'm a little boggled by the notion of people buying preloaded Linux because it's cheaper.

    My experience has been that preloaded Windows is always cheaper because it comes along with a boatload (or should that be "bloatload"?) of bloatware. The vendors of the bloatware pay enough to the OEM to defray the cost of the Windows, to the point that the final cost to the buyer is lower than a Linux install with no bloatware.

    Now, maybe I've been looking at the wrong vendors, but the last time I looked at Dell, the equivalent Linux machine was always just a bit more expensive than that same Windows PC.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kano
    replied
    You can certainly flash more systems with Linux and flashrom than you might think. But compared to BIOS builtin or DOS flash tools no config data is kept. The most part is not that critical, but for example new asus systems use insyde uefi versions that store the mac adress there. If you know what you do you can use ethtool to restore the mac adress you want. But the general user should prefer using the official flash tools. For backup purpose flashrom however is great, it even stores the current settings of those uefi systems if you like that. More users should test it and report back to flashrom, the current default way to access the eeprom seems to be SPI and i think much more boards than the listed ones would work with it. If you have got a backup you can run fsdump.py to easyly identify raw parts with config settings. Also you can check 6 byts at 1000h offset for the mac adress of your first nic... I am definitely a fan of flashrom, i used it with older systems a lot to flash modified roms - added via raid rom, gpxe or ipxe rom instead of pxe rom, plop instead of pxe. i also flashed a 3com nic with ipxe and plop (you have to disable onboard nic but enable lan boot). It is a really great tool.

    http://flashrom.org/Supported_hardware

    Leave a comment:


  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Originally posted by pingufunkybeat View Post
    I'd love to buy a laptop with some flavour of Linux pre-installed, and all hardware working!

    Of course, the first thing I'd do is wipe it clean and install and configure my own system, but it's great to know that a) the OEM supports Linux, b) the hardware is supported by Linux, and c) you're not paying MS tax.
    Yeap. I bought one Linux system like that, with Ubuntu preinstalled. From Dell, of course. But it makes no sense whatsoever to keep the default Ubuntu installation, as it was already old (had Maverick Meerkat, while at that time Oneiric was out). That said, it did tell you to upgrade the first time you booted, but Linux is all about choice, after all. That PC was a simple work PC (hence it's really ludicrous to have Windows on it to begin with), and not used by me, but rather another person. I presented some of the LiveCDs of different distributions and DEs to him, and he chose a different distro than Ubuntu. Hence, the system was wiped shortly after first boot, to be replaced with another, newer and more preferable Linux distro.
    Mind you, that PC isn't all that good for Linux after all. For instance, you can flash the BIOS... from Windows. Or DOS. But not from Linux...

    As for how they know who uses the PCs - they add an empty repository that leads to their servers and therefore the Linux machine sends a ping to them each time when using the package manager. the existence of that fake repository is also pointed out on first boot, with a polite request not to remove it. Thankfully, Dell is not intrusive and didn't put any preloaded bloat on it, either.

    Leave a comment:

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