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RKVDEC2 Driver Posted For Accelerated Video Decoding On Newer Rockchip SoCs

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  • RKVDEC2 Driver Posted For Accelerated Video Decoding On Newer Rockchip SoCs

    Phoronix: RKVDEC2 Driver Posted For Accelerated Video Decoding On Newer Rockchip SoCs

    For years there has been the RKVDEC Linux media driver to provide accelerated video decoding on Rockchip SoCs. Being worked on now is RKVDEC2 for providing video decoding on the newer Rockchip SoCs...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    Interesting how good RK3588s is for Frigate NVR, how many cameras it can handle with HW decode on new driver with NPU detection in substreams. I have to build one in next year to check it :-)

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    • #3
      I just wish company's like Rockchip and broadcom would ship these SoC's early to collabora and pay them big time so upstream Linux support wouldn't take so long.
      Last edited by MastaG; 16 June 2024, 07:26 AM.

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      • #4
        More and more I am starting to realize Collabora is a gem of a company, we are lucky to have them around doing the work that they do.

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        • #5
          ARM computers on Linux =
          - Spotty distro support. Pi 4 supported Fedora, openSUSE, and other non-Debian distros like 4-5 years after it was released. While most N100 and other competitive mini-pcs getting the support like on day one.
          - Never work with VA-API, which Chromium browsers and every one else supported. Video encoding and decoding in media player is also a hassle to set up.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by archerallstars View Post
            ARM computers on Linux =
            - Spotty distro support. Pi 4 supported Fedora, openSUSE, and other non-Debian distros like 4-5 years after it was released. While most N100 and other competitive mini-pcs getting the support like on day one.
            - Never work with VA-API, which Chromium browsers and every one else supported. Video encoding and decoding in media player is also a hassle to set up.
            all you say is true but you have the wrong perspective and as soon as you have the right one you will like it.

            all this in the past it was all only to keep developers motivated not consumers.

            the ARM consumer products is the Qualcomm Elite X products ... means the PI4 or PI5 was NEVER a consumer product it was always only a developer product. for companies and developers who want to develop their own products and even develop their own drivers.

            you see even the PI5 is not a serious product is is still manufactured in 16nm instead of the more serious 8nm of the orange pi5...

            if you want a ARM product for consumers buy Apple M1/M2/M3/m4 or Qualcomm Elite x
            Phantom circuit Sequence Reducer Dyslexia

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            • #7
              Originally posted by qarium View Post
              the PI4 or PI5 was NEVER a consumer product it was always only a developer product
              Is the Pi 400 a consumer product, then? How could it fit in as a dev box? Eh, it isn't even a box. At least, on the Pi website, it's said to be a personal computer. Does it support any of the hardware accelerations that a sane personal computer should support?

              And note that both Pi 4 and Pi 5, according to Raspberry, are desktop computers for home use. That's what written on their website.

              Originally posted by qarium View Post
              if you want a ARM product for consumers buy Apple M1/M2/M3/m4 or Qualcomm Elite x
              Neither Apple M nor Qualcomm Elite X, would support VA-API video acceleration on Linux, since I specifically mentioned ARM computers on Linux, they're not relevant.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by archerallstars View Post
                Is the Pi 400 a consumer product, then? How could it fit in as a dev box? Eh, it isn't even a box. At least, on the Pi website, it's said to be a personal computer. Does it support any of the hardware accelerations that a sane personal computer should support?
                And note that both Pi 4 and Pi 5, according to Raspberry, are desktop computers for home use. That's what written on their website.
                Neither Apple M nor Qualcomm Elite X, would support VA-API video acceleration on Linux, since I specifically mentioned ARM computers on Linux, they're not relevant.
                what is a personal computer ? is a IBM Personal Computer Model 5150 a personal computer by today standards ?

                you have to see the PI 400 in this meaning... it is maybe a personal computer but its like a IBM PC Model 5150 not fit for any consumer in 2024...

                the IBM PC Model 5150 does not have any hardware accelerations that a sane personal computer should support...
                Phantom circuit Sequence Reducer Dyslexia

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by qarium View Post
                  is a IBM Personal Computer Model 5150 a personal computer by today standards ?
                  What does a 1981 PC has anything to do with today standards???

                  You should ask: was it a proper PC when it was released?

                  Originally posted by qarium View Post
                  the IBM PC Model 5150 does not have any hardware accelerations that a sane personal computer should support...
                  Hardware acceleration didn't exist in 1981...

                  While Pi 400 was released in November 2020 as a PC, and hardware acceleration on PC preceding it like a decade ago...
                  Last edited by archerallstars; 18 June 2024, 12:08 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by archerallstars View Post
                    What does a 1981 PC has anything to do with today standards???
                    You should ask: was it a proper PC when it was released?
                    Hardware acceleration didn't exist in 1981...
                    While Pi 400 was released in November 2020 as a PC, and hardware acceleration on PC preceding it like a decade ago...
                    the point is... no one who is developer and knows what he does should buy a PI 400

                    the PI 400 by today standards is not a personal computer.
                    Phantom circuit Sequence Reducer Dyslexia

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