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Linux 6.10 Is Making It Much Easier To Deal With Quirky Touchscreens

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  • Linux 6.10 Is Making It Much Easier To Deal With Quirky Touchscreens

    Phoronix: Linux 6.10 Is Making It Much Easier To Deal With Quirky Touchscreens

    Right now when dealing with quirky/buggy touchscreens a C file needs to be manually manipulated and the Linux kernel recompiled. With a new "i2c_touchscreen_props" kernel command line option on its way to the mainline kernel, the process of overriding touchscreen properties is dramatically easier for those dealing with Linux on touchscreen-enabled devices...

    Phoronix, Linux Hardware Reviews, Linux hardware benchmarks, Linux server benchmarks, Linux benchmarking, Desktop Linux, Linux performance, Open Source graphics, Linux How To, Ubuntu benchmarks, Ubuntu hardware, Phoronix Test Suite

  • #2
    we have all these fancy regulatory agencies. So instead of the unnecessary busy work they do today, why not demand that a released device conform to the specification? This would make competition fair where the device would need to support a standard, not just "windows"

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    • #3
      Note that Silead touchscreens (found on budget devices mostly) have laptop/tablet model specific firmware (so a separate firmware version for each tablet model). The kernel not only requires a unique per tablet model firmware-name because of this. But it also needs additional info, specifically the ranges of the values reported for the X and Y coordinates of touches and these often need axis swapping/mirroring on top of this.

      Besides the new kernel commandline option for easy testing of the parameters I have also written documentation on how to determine/find the right parameters for new/unsupported tablet models:

      Last edited by hansdegoede; 31 May 2024, 08:18 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by varikonniemi View Post
        we have all these fancy regulatory agencies. So instead of the unnecessary busy work they do today, why not demand that a released device conform to the specification? This would make competition fair where the device would need to support a standard, not just "windows"
        Lobby the European Parliament once they no longer need their full attention focused on bringing Apple to heel over Apple's attempts to engage in malicious compliance with the Digital Markets Act. If they can force standardization of the interface between phones and chargers, then forcing standardization of the interface between hardware and the OS for reasons similar to the DMA's raison d'etre (i.e. open market for OSes) would be right up their alley.

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        • #5
          This is yet another one of those "why wasn't this done 20 years ago?" kind of things. I'm sure this took Hans just a couple days to work on. While I think it's great he did this, he shouldn't have had to.
          One of the things that has kept people away from Linux for so long (and in turn, hindered its progress in other ways) is exactly stuff like that touchscreen driver (or whatever you want to call it), where sometimes you can get something to work, but in the most unnecessarily user-unfriendly and time-wasting way possible.
          One could argue that "real" Linux users know how to manipulate C code, but that's not the point. For one thing, it doesn't change the fact that it's still an unnecessary waste of time to have to manipulate it and recompile it yourself (and don't tell me there's long-term benefits in doing so because I'm sure in this case the system resources this consumes are negligible) but if these other Linux users are so legit in their C skills then why haven't any of them stepped up to actually make a complete product?

          And before any of you harp on "then why don't you do it?" it's because I haven't encountered such a touchscreen. Every touchscreen I've used in Linux either worked OOB or worked easily with graphical calibration tools.

          People like Hans are a valuable resource to the open-source community, and shouldn't be wasting his time finishing other people's work.

          </rant>

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          • #6
            yay, with the patches in bliss and working great, this should help quite a few users, I realize that these devices are pretty uncommon for "generic linux" but for android they were a bit of a pain point https://x.com/blissos_org/status/1795048936777920825

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