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  • #21
    Originally posted by anarki2 View Post

    Nice offtopic attempt. If you have a problem with that, buy something else.
    So what would be on-topic according to you?
    It's not like I am planning to go for Apple after evaluating cost of ownership.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by t.s. View Post
      AFAIK, it's not user replaceable. You must bring it to Apple. They replace the NAND, then 'reset' it with their software.
      Red the other comments. It is replaceable, but the fact that the controller is in the SoC means the contents are lost.

      You can swap it at home yourself. The software used is called Configurator 2 and anyone can run it.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Developer12 View Post

        Red the other comments. It is replaceable, but the fact that the controller is in the SoC means the contents are lost.

        You can swap it at home yourself. The software used is called Configurator 2 and anyone can run it.
        Yes but thats not entirely true, it is replaceable BUT if you replace it with a larger drive (even an official one taken from another Mac mini) then it will not work because there is an artificial software lock on it (and many people have confirmed the same behavior). The replacement only works if the drive sizes are exactly the same, otherwise you need Mac software they keep secretly to unlock the drives to make it work.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

          Yes but thats not entirely true, it is replaceable BUT if you replace it with a larger drive (even an official one taken from another Mac mini) then it will not work because there is an artificial software lock on it (and many people have confirmed the same behavior). The replacement only works if the drive sizes are exactly the same, otherwise you need Mac software they keep secretly to unlock the drives to make it work.
          As far as I know is does work just fine with larger sizes, HOWEVER you must use a supported config. If there isn't an equivalent configuration in a shipping version of the product, then there's no entry in the firmware tables. This also means that if the larger version uses one larger drive, you can't try to match it using two 1/2 size drives.

          The "secret unlock" doesn't exist afaik. It's just Configurator 2. You may be referring to trying to swap drives without reconfiguring.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Developer12 View Post

            As far as I know is does work just fine with larger sizes, HOWEVER you must use a supported config. If there isn't an equivalent configuration in a shipping version of the product, then there's no entry in the firmware tables. This also means that if the larger version uses one larger drive, you can't try to match it using two 1/2 size drives.

            The "secret unlock" doesn't exist afaik. It's just Configurator 2. You may be referring to trying to swap drives without reconfiguring.
            https://youtu.be/8IHqntr8FjY?t=660 I am referring to this, and yes they did use configurator but it only worked with the same drive sizes. With a different sized drive the configurator fails with an error and the machine just completely fails to boot.
            Last edited by mdedetrich; 10 May 2022, 03:58 AM.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

              https://youtu.be/8IHqntr8FjY?t=660 I am referring to this, and yes they did use configurator but it only worked with the same drive sizes. With a different sized drive the configurator fails with an error and the machine just completely fails to boot.
              Yes, but is that configuration of sizes one that apple ships in an existing SKU? The thing can't configure for a set of chips that isn't in the firmware table.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by Developer12 View Post

                Yes, but is that configuration of sizes one that apple ships in an existing SKU?
                Well in order to buy a Mac Mini you have to specify the size of a SSD, its impossible to buy one without an SSD inside (i.e. you have to configure the size).

                Originally posted by Developer12 View Post
                The thing can't configure for a set of chips that isn't in the firmware table.
                Sure that may be the reason but this is what I was saying earlier which is that its not possible to either upgrade or downgrade the size of the SSD in a Mac Mini (at least as a non Apple employee), you can only replace same size SSD's. Linus does have a point here which is that Apple did design and engineer it this way, I mean the whole thing is built inhouse.
                Last edited by mdedetrich; 11 May 2022, 04:56 AM.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

                  Well in order to buy a Mac Mini you have to specify the size of a SSD, its impossible to buy one without an SSD inside (i.e. you have to configure the size).
                  That has nothing to do with what I asked. To make up some numbers, if apple only ever ships a 512 GB computer with one 512MB card, then it won't work with two 256GB cards. There is no entry in the firmware tables to make that work.

                  Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
                  Sure that may be the reason but this is what I was saying earlier which is that its not possible to either upgrade or downgrade the size of the SSD in a Mac Mini (at least as a non Apple employee), you can only replace same size SSD's. Linus does have a point here which is that Apple did design and engineer it this way, I mean the whole thing is built inhouse.
                  As far as I know you can upgrade to a different size just fine, so long as the combination of modules is one that apple ships in other machines.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by Developer12 View Post
                    That has nothing to do with what I asked. To make up some numbers, if apple only ever ships a 512 GB computer with one 512MB card, then it won't work with two 256GB cards. There is no entry in the firmware tables to make that work.


                    As far as I know you can upgrade to a different size just fine, so long as the combination of modules is one that apple ships in other machines.
                    So I really don't understand what you are talking about, can you post a link explaining it?

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
                      Just a note: In my opinion, it would be better if NVMe "accelerator chips" (data compression/decompression) were an open standard so that they become a common feature in notebooks and desktop PCs. The physical size of a block on a NVMe device is relatively large (on the order of 1 megabyte), which has a better compression ratio than compressing a 4 KiB block in isolation, and off-line compression (the NVMe device by itself performing re-compression of blocks previously lightly compressed on the fly, when it isn't under load) makes sense. Additionally, a NVMe device might move 512/4096-byte sectors having a common data pattern (such as: text files, executables) into a single block on the device to achieve a higher compression ratio. This seems to be an "unexplored territory" on regular PCs today.
                      Originally posted by discordian View Post

                      NAND storage is highly complex with tons of characteristics changing. With SOCs, some time ago it was common to have raw nand access and simple controllers and you had to write your own software for handling.
                      Believe me, no one wants to go back in that direction

                      The thing you talking about could easily be handled on top, with filesystems acknowledging the page sizes. See for example PS5.
                      Update: NVMe 2.0 KV (Key Value) command-set supports some form of value compression&decompression. First NVM 2.0 SSDs are expected to arrive later this year.

                      https://nvmexpress.org/everything-yo...cal-proposals/

                      https://nvmexpress.org/changes-in-nv...-revision-2-0/ (PDF "TP 4015b NVMe Key Value" in the ZIP file).

                      https://www.snia.org/sites/default/f...dard-Final.pdf

                      https://www.tomshardware.com/news/te...-pcie-gen5-ssd

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