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Sony Contributes ~73%+ Performance Improvement For exFAT Linux Driver

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  • Sony Contributes ~73%+ Performance Improvement For exFAT Linux Driver

    Phoronix: Sony Contributes ~73%+ Performance Improvement For exFAT Linux Driver

    The exFAT file-system driver for the Linux kernel continues maturing nicely with new features, fixes, and performance improvements. The latest Linux exFAT driver improvement worth mentioning is a significant performance improvement from a Sony engineer...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...AT-Thanks-Sony

  • #2
    Wonderful!
    A bit sad that it didn't come in 5.18.
    BTW, anyone knows how to specify the cluster size when formatting a flash drive with a GUI like Gparted or KDE Partition manager?
    I saw that you can specify the cluster size if you format the flash drive in Windows 7 with the normal right click -> Format, but I can't seem to find such an option in Linux formatting GUIs.

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    • #3
      Very nice, but if its going to be used on 5.19 it will not affect a lot of mobiles. Most likely they have to backport it down to...3.x? or 4.19? dont know which one is currently used for Android phones. But usually its quite old old long long stable.

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      • #4
        Danny3: Not GUI but the mkfs.exfat command has a --cluster-size=size option to specify the size.

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        • #5
          Also I think the 73% is only measured in an extreme case where you use a small blocksize, mount using dirsync and create a lot of directories...

          It's not going to do much for the average Joe..

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          • #6
            Originally posted by George99 View Post
            Danny3: Not GUI but the mkfs.exfat command has a --cluster-size=size option to specify the size.
            That's good too, but I have to save it somewhere as I will not remember it.
            Thank you!

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            • #7
              I never used that filesystem to be honest. What are its advantages? It's open source? It comes from Microsoft, right?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by piorunz View Post
                I never used that filesystem to be honest. What are its advantages? It's open source? It comes from Microsoft, right?
                It is compatible with windows and that's about it. It may be the least bad option out of fat32 ntfs and exfat.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Danny3 View Post

                  That's good too, but I have to save it somewhere as I will not remember it.
                  Code:
                  mkfs.exfat --help
                  That's why commands have a --help switch.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by piorunz View Post
                    I never used that filesystem to be honest. What are its advantages? It's open source? It comes from Microsoft, right?
                    It is open source and has one HUGE advantage: like (V)FAT it offers perfect interoperability by being supported by everything and everyone. But unlike (V)FAT, it's 64 bit so it doesn't suffer from the same volume size limitations. I think (but don't take my word for it) that it also got rid of that horrible hack in VFAT that allowed long file names on top of the old 8+3 format. Instead it supports long file names natively.

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