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Fwupd 1.7.4 Supports More Hardware For Firmware Updating On Linux

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  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by ezst036 View Post


    Either way Asus and MSI and the others ignore us when in a sane world our presence in this area is outsized.
    In a sane world, Linux users don't even make up a blip in any hardware OEM's radar.

    Steve Jobs said it before in in early 2000s and it still applies today: Apple plus Microsoft make up almost 100% of the desktop OS market.

    You are nothing.

    Leave a comment:


  • ezst036
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    Any braindead person with a good instruction manual can assemble a PC. There is nothing technical about it.
    That's fine. The perception of the technicality of the work is greater then the actual technicality that the work requires. That does nothing to refute what I said.

    Linux users could be grandmas. But typically, they aren't. It is what it is.

    Either way Asus and MSI and the others ignore us when in a sane world our presence in this area is outsized.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brane215
    replied
    Originally posted by pal666 View Post
    moron, firmware is hardware's implementation detail and all your hardware is one large binary blob
    no, you can't
    Good point. We need to open source hardware. Bring in the sunshine to disinfect dark spots.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by Terrablit View Post
    If you go through life thinking that you're a superior person or more skilled because of the decisions you made, you're in for a world of hurt. Our decisions aren't fully logical and we're not deluding anyone when we pretentiously claim such. A lot of what we pick is based on preferences and priorities - not coldly calculated, exhaustive logic. Acting otherwise will only fool ourselves - not others.

    Honestly, this kind of paper tiger elitism is the worst part of Linux and BSD. Yes, it's a technical marvel. It's amazing how good it is, and how many people collaborate on it. Many parts of the installation and regular desktop usage still fall into the raging dumpster-fire category. Same with Windows. Some things work really well. Others have been multi-year frustrations that never seem to get any attention. There will always be room for improvement.
    Unfortunately, most people here have thick skulls and willfully blinded themselves to this fact.

    Originally posted by Terrablit
    When you tell yourself that you made decisions because they were the best decisions possible, you invest yourself in that decision. You feel personally attacked when people disagree. You dig deep into forums and narratives to justify your decisions. You take things out of context, internalizing loose guidelines as unassailable philosophies and life goals. You project your own wants and needs on the landscape and start to attack those who disagree. You start seeing a lack of traction and competing initiatives as a conspiracy, rather than just being people who want different things. You treat everything that you don't personally use at this very moment in time as bloat. Above all, you see this decision as a pivotal decision in the industry - the start of a slippery slope. Meanwhile others couldn't care less - except for the fact that you're really giving them some creepy vibes.

    -snip-

    It's completely fine to be a casual user. It's also fine to be intensely interested in subjects. But it's not fine to act like your intricate obsession somehow makes you better than someone else. All we have in this world is time, and time is most valuable when we spend it on what we value most. If endless distro and WM hopping and config tweaking brings you joy, that's fine. Go wild. But don't force that need on others by blocking progress and simplification and hate-mailing contributors. And don't act like it's a noble pursuit that makes you better than others. Some people just want to get their work done so that they have more time to spend on other things. They're not better, just different.
    Unfortunate but true. Look at the number of lusers in here who are so drugged up and high about using Linux as a desktop that they believe themselves to be power lusers who are more technical and competent than Windows users, and are even in a position to "influence" the average computer user when in truth they are more ignorant than the average user for not knowing where to look for stuff on the Windows graphical interface.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by pal666 View Post
    are you suggesting not using computers at all?
    maybe somewhere out the some crappy SBC will be ok enough xD

    Leave a comment:


  • pal666
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
    So if you want to get the likes of ASROCK, MSI, etc to support Linux you'll have to vote with your wallet.
    are you suggesting not using computers at all?

    Leave a comment:


  • pal666
    replied
    Originally posted by Brane215 View Post
    FWUPD looks like another attempt to solidify spying binary blobs
    moron, firmware is hardware's implementation detail and all your hardware is one large binary blob
    Originally posted by Brane215 View Post
    IF you want to simply update FW now, you can do it with flashrom.
    no, you can't

    Leave a comment:


  • reba
    replied
    Originally posted by Terrablit View Post
    ...
    Thank you for the reflection.

    Leave a comment:


  • chrisq
    replied
    Originally posted by Terrablit View Post
    If you go through life thinking that you're a superior person or more skilled because of the decisions you made, you're in for a world of hurt. Our decisions aren't fully logical and we're not deluding anyone when we pretentiously claim such. A lot of what we pick is based on preferences and priorities - not coldly calculated, exhaustive logic. Acting otherwise will only fool ourselves - not others.

    Honestly, this kind of paper tiger elitism is the worst part of Linux and BSD. Yes, it's a technical marvel. It's amazing how good it is, and how many people collaborate on it. Many parts of the installation and regular desktop usage still fall into the raging dumpster-fire category. Same with Windows. Some things work really well. Others have been multi-year frustrations that never seem to get any attention. There will always be room for improvement.

    When you tell yourself that you made decisions because they were the best decisions possible, you invest yourself in that decision. You feel personally attacked when people disagree. You dig deep into forums and narratives to justify your decisions. You take things out of context, internalizing loose guidelines as unassailable philosophies and life goals. You project your own wants and needs on the landscape and start to attack those who disagree. You start seeing a lack of traction and competing initiatives as a conspiracy, rather than just being people who want different things. You treat everything that you don't personally use at this very moment in time as bloat. Above all, you see this decision as a pivotal decision in the industry - the start of a slippery slope. Meanwhile others couldn't care less - except for the fact that you're really giving them some creepy vibes. Those negative feelings are on you.

    In reality, computers are tools. Very useful and flexible tools, but tools. Some people order and make custom tools. Some just buy whatever's available. Some people baby their tools, while others let them rust and replace them. Some have one tool, others have lots of tools. And some people take their work home with them, while others just clock in and out and don't want to spend more of their lives selecting, adjusting or arguing about tools than necessary. Take your hand off the keyboard and mouse. You're still you without a tool in your hand. So your tools aren't what defines you.

    It's completely fine to be a casual user. It's also fine to be intensely interested in subjects. But it's not fine to act like your intricate obsession somehow makes you better than someone else. All we have in this world is time, and time is most valuable when we spend it on what we value most. If endless distro and WM hopping and config tweaking brings you joy, that's fine. Go wild. But don't force that need on others by blocking progress and simplification and hate-mailing contributors. And don't act like it's a noble pursuit that makes you better than others. Some people just want to get their work done so that they have more time to spend on other things. They're not better, just different. As are you.

    If you want to be accepted for being different, you've got to learn to apply that to others. That means not gatekeeping, and not treating Linux like your little hipster baby that can never grow up and be used by people who don't understand every piece of it. It means GUIs, service integration and consolidation. It means letting corporations package and sell software that works on it without an initial buy-in to open source. It means putting down your paranoid conspiracies and Linux is for Loners attitude and letting it grow to meet the needs of different people.

    The kernel and userspace are open source. You will always have the ability to pull it apart and customize it from the ground up. So there's no need to block or oust the people who just want to be casual users. Make room, so that being a Linux user is not a label or a brand, but a thing that everyone does without overthinking it. Normalizing what you do won't make you any less special. Even if it was hard for you being technical in a non-technical world, don't get bitter. Pave the way for the next generation to be technical without having to be outcasts.

    Also, if you see someone gatekeeping or attacking other people and organizations for making changes that broaden the reach of Linux and technology in general, call them the fuck out. People need to be informed o how that kind of behavior is bad and that we don't want it around anymore. Be nice if you can, but if you can't, one lost gatekeeper makes room for several more people.

    Linux isn't a community, but a resource for building and connecting other communities.
    No one seems to care more than you guy.
    What an embarrassingly long wall of text.

    Leave a comment:


  • Azrael5
    replied
    the majority of hardware manufacturers avoid to support this initiative in order to speculate by obsolescence and security weakness. Demonstrated by several pieces of beta bios/uefi able to enable new features.

    Leave a comment:

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