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Raspberry Pi PoE+ HAT Announced With Greater Power Capability For $20

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  • ed31337
    replied
    Whatever happened to the open source mantra of "release early, release often?"

    If RPF waited around until all the software was fully implemented, we wouldn't even have the RPi4 in our hands yet. That's ridiculous. RPF gets the hardware out the door, then it's up to us in the open source community to help flesh out the software, and I'm perfectly happy with that.

    I've been running 64-bit Gentoo on my RPi4 for about a year now. My RPi4 is a 4GB model with the USB C power bug (honestly, the bug does not affect me one bit). It's been great! Best computer I've had yet, so cheap, and yet more reliable than my old overheat-prone Intel laptop.
    Last edited by ed31337; 26 May 2021, 09:09 PM.

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  • mangeek
    replied
    I don't want to jump on the rage wagon, because I love my Raspberry Pis, and I'm not qualified to understand why they are the way they are, but...

    It feels like the 'custom chip based on VideoCore' has always put the thing a few years behind what it's capable of (due to software) and makes the whole thing weird. At this point, with these levels of sales, wouldn't a more generic CPU/GPU combo with EDK2 firmware be wise?

    Instead of making compromises to hit the $35 price point, couldn't they build a more generic PCIe/USB-based board and stratify the price based on a 'basic' vs. 'premium' SoC and memory options (e.g., let the premium sales subsidize the basic tier)?

    I just hope the next Pi boots generic ARM64 distros and has a GPU that can do Vulkan well enough that all the Zink features work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daites
    replied
    Some well know chineses manufacturers do have POE+ Hat in they catalog for many months with top quality, up-to-date and a wiki with technical specs and a little cheapier.
    This HAT from RPF is a joke, they didn't even follow their own recomandation; where is the cutout for picam ???

    Leave a comment:


  • Jabberwocky
    replied
    Originally posted by willmore View Post

    I have to agree with all of this. The RPF has a very long history of making really obvious mistakes with their hardware designs. I don't know what it is about their internal structure, but they seem to be missing any kind of functioning review process. To make matters worse their attitude seems to be to not admit making any mistakes and to instead "double down" on them. The Rpi 2 was relased on Feb 2015 and raspbian was still ARMv6hf. There was no launch day ARMv7 version of raspian. There still isn't to this day. A year later the Rpi 3 was released which was ARMv8. There was no 64 bit raspbian on launch day. They're still working on that over five years later.
    The end-users and content creators don't seem to care enough to notice the dirt that's swept under the rug. This is also frustrating to me. For example they still have not updated their https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/why...e-or-meltdown/ I rant about it every now and then.

    The 64 bit raspbian is a fundamental problem with hardware that is not _fully_ mainlined, that said I have been running 64 bit rasbpian for more than a year. You have to spend time to test updates or not update your OS at all since updates frequently broke (parts of) the system.

    From a technical perspective it's sad to see so little effort put into these important areas, however their product is doing really well so again I think not that many people care about the "finer" details.

    Leave a comment:


  • willmore
    replied
    Originally posted by danmcgrew View Post
    Why should they be trusted now?
    I have to agree with all of this. The RPF has a very long history of making really obvious mistakes with their hardware designs. I don't know what it is about their internal structure, but they seem to be missing any kind of functioning review process. To make matters worse their attitude seems to be to not admit making any mistakes and to instead "double down" on them. The Rpi 2 was relased on Feb 2015 and raspbian was still ARMv6hf. There was no launch day ARMv7 version of raspian. There still isn't to this day. A year later the Rpi 3 was released which was ARMv8. There was no 64 bit raspbian on launch day. They're still working on that over five years later.

    Leave a comment:


  • danmcgrew
    replied
    Why should they be trusted now?

    Are we to assume, from this, that the Raspberry Pi group has decided to admit they can't do the simplest of electrical engineering design tasks (the design of a linear--analog--power supply); or, even worse: can not even COPY a "suggested design" straight out of the manufacturer's data sheet without first checking that the "suggested design" MIGHT NOT BE SUITABLE TO BE OFFERED AS ONE OF THEIR CATALOG PRODUCTS?

    What's that you say? Raspberry Pi doesn't COPY designs?
    Well, you're right about that one. They not only DON'T copy designs, but have so much hubris that they cannot / won't even copy a design without screwing it up. Do the RPI4's USB-C problems ring a bell? THAT problem was due to the fact that all the the RPi group had to do was simply to copy the reference design provided in the USB-C specification. But, wouldn't you know?-- the RPi Group knew better than the USB-C folks--so they changed their implementation of that reference design SO THAT IT NO LONGER WORKED!

    Have Raspberry Pi hired an electrical engineer who is competent in the design of electronic product? I seriously doubt it; they know too much to ever do that. Just ask them.

    Has Eben Upton's advisers decided that there have simply been too many stupid mistakes made, since day one, for his dissembling and tap-dancing all around RPi problems--which has been Upton's stock-in-trade response to ANY Raspberry Pi shortcoming--to not work any longer, and to have started being a liability, as well as being exceedingly transparent? I seriously doubt it; the monumental stupidity has been going on far too long.

    Who did THIS design? If you're going to use it, you'd better hope it wasn't one of the Raspberry Pi Group's vaunted "designers". Unless, of course, you haven't yet had enough.

    Leave a comment:


  • aschmidtm
    replied
    You don’t need a hat to run a Pi over PoE. It’s called a PoE splitter. You can get them that split Ethernet off to a barrel Jack and/or all sorts of USB.

    Leave a comment:


  • satadru
    replied
    Originally posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    I'm happy that PoE is getting so much official support. It's just a bit expensive and noisy (even at idle).
    I would also love for them (and other makers of RPI accessories) to do a collaboration with Noctua and get some properly quiet fans.

    Leave a comment:


  • brunosalezze
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    To bad you need a "hat" for it, and it doesn't support PoE out-of-the-box.
    Thats just economics, modularity and personal needs.

    I really like the poe hat and have an ssd attached as use as a media sharing local storage, plus pihole, torrent and some other network services. Really like the versatility

    Leave a comment:


  • uid313
    replied
    To bad you need a "hat" for it, and it doesn't support PoE out-of-the-box.

    Leave a comment:

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