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Months After Being Deprecated, Linux Ready To Say Goodbye To WiMAX

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  • Months After Being Deprecated, Linux Ready To Say Goodbye To WiMAX

    Phoronix: Months After Being Deprecated, Linux Ready To Say Goodbye To WiMAX

    In addition to the legacy IDE driver code ready to go from the mainline Linux kernel, receiving its final death sentence now is also the WiMAX support...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...Dropping-WiMAX

  • #2
    I can't think of any end-user use cases for WiMax that wouldn't be better served by Starlink. I don't think anyone is going to miss this code.
    Last edited by torsionbar28; 21 March 2021, 11:04 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
      I can't think of any end-user use cases for WiMax that wouldn't be better served by Starlink. I don't think anyone is going to miss this code.
      You're wrong: this is the Linux and esp. Phoronix community, so there will always be at least one person who's going to miss old code

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      • #4
        The old code monsters be lurking.

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        • #5
          I've seen a couple of posts here lately about code being pulled out from the kernel, but also that someone is busy working on bringing N64 support to the kernel.

          Are there a certain number of users of a particular code that are needed for software to be included in the kernel? Or is it just a matter of someone being willing to maintain it and it'll be included? The N64 support was interesting and I didn't know if the developer needs to justify their use case to be included, or if can just develop the software and as long as the quality is there and they are available to maintain support, is inclusion in the kernel just a given?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by antnythr View Post
            I've seen a couple of posts here lately about code being pulled out from the kernel, but also that someone is busy working on bringing N64 support to the kernel.

            Are there a certain number of users of a particular code that are needed for software to be included in the kernel? Or is it just a matter of someone being willing to maintain it and it'll be included? The N64 support was interesting and I didn't know if the developer needs to justify their use case to be included, or if can just develop the software and as long as the quality is there and they are available to maintain support, is inclusion in the kernel just a given?
            It is mostly about if someone is willing to maintain the code. With a bit of how-much-the-code-interacts/interferes-with-other-code thrown in for flavor.

            N64 Kernel passes both (for now) because the codebase it is (for now) being actively maintained by someone(s), and it doesn't appear to cause any significant inter-dependency issues with the rest of the stack (you could even pull the "supporting-weird-architectures-can-draw-out-obscure-bugs" argument, to a degree).

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

              You're wrong: this is the Linux and esp. Phoronix community, so there will always be at least one person who's going to miss old code
              NOOOO NOT THE WIMAXERINO! how else am i going to drive my internets to the max now?

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              • #8
                DIE
                By my hand
                I creep across the land
                Riding Intel's van

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                  DIE
                  By my hand
                  I creep across the land
                  Riding Intel's van

                  I'm WiMAX's death? :-)
                  Last edited by Nth_man; 21 March 2021, 07:02 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Good thing the article mentioned what WiMAX was, it is a forgotten tech around here.

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