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Linux 5.10 To Play Nicely With The Matias Wireless Aluminum Keyboard

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  • Linux 5.10 To Play Nicely With The Matias Wireless Aluminum Keyboard

    Phoronix: Linux 5.10 To Play Nicely With The Matias Wireless Aluminum Keyboard

    The Matias Wireless Aluminum Keyboard is an Apple-esque keyboard that will be working nicely on Linux 5.10 when it comes to its extra functionality...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...atias-Keyboard

  • #2
    So is the kernel aware of the material, or why is the aluminum part emphasized so much? Let's say you redesign the shell, 3D print it out of plastic, then transplant the entire electronics untouched. How does the kernel react? Is it even aware?

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    • #3
      It isn't really "inspired by" an Apple keyboard - it has an Apple keyboard layout. I suspect all they wanted to do is piggy-back off the default keybindings you get when you plug in an Apple keyboard (and maybe get some free advertising).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by eydee View Post
        So is the kernel aware of the material, or why is the aluminum part emphasized so much? Let's say you redesign the shell, 3D print it out of plastic, then transplant the entire electronics untouched. How does the kernel react? Is it even aware?
        Because the product name appears to be the Matias Wireless Aluminum Keyboard?
        Michael Larabel
        http://www.michaellarabel.com/

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        • #5
          How is this keyboard cheaper than their infamous halfkeyboard?

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          • #6
            As Scotty would say...

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            • #7
              It always amazes me that something like a keyboard can not be supported. This stuff was solved back in the 70s. What is that defective keyboard doing? Why is it sending incorrect signals and still being sold?

              I got a Mac Mini many years ago and the official wired usb Apple "Aluminium" Keyboard was simply not picked up until the OS had started. So if I wanted to boot from disk at startup, I was pretty screwed. What a load of non-standard crud. I had to use my HP usb keyboard (similar age) every time I did a clean install of the OS.

              Apple never updated the firmware to properly support it and I believe that was the last time I purchased an apple product. 2006 I think.
              At the time it was a very common issue but Apple had no interest in fixing the defect. Years after the hardware broke, someone found an unofficial hack to solve this: https://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/...tartup+strokes

              That was possibly my first experience that taught me that "modern" hardware isn't always better and it certainly isn't always more correct.
              Last edited by kpedersen; 10-18-2020, 07:19 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                It always amazes me that something like a keyboard can not be supported. This stuff was solved back in the 70s. What is that defective keyboard doing? Why is it sending incorrect signals and still being sold?
                It's pretty funny you mention the "older times" in which there were so many incompatible keyboard standards even sharing the same cables. Some of them even damaged your hardware if you plugged in the wrong type. But if you consider that "solved" and better than stuff like USB-HID, then I don't know what to say really

                Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                I got a Mac Mini many years ago and the official wired usb Apple "Aluminium" Keyboard was simply not picked up until the OS had started. So if I wanted to boot from disk at startup, I was pretty screwed. What a load of non-standard crud. I had to use my HP usb keyboard (similar age) every time I did a clean install of the OS.

                Apple never updated the firmware to properly support it and I believe that was the last time I purchased an apple product. 2006 I think.
                At the time it was a very common issue but Apple had no interest in fixing the defect. Years after the hardware broke, someone found an unofficial hack to solve this: https://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/...tartup+strokes

                That was possibly my first experience that taught me that "modern" hardware isn't always better and it certainly isn't always more correct.
                To be honest that's on Apple, really.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by numacross View Post

                  It's pretty funny you mention the "older times" in which there were so many incompatible keyboard standards even sharing the same cables.
                  Not cross vendor but if I bought an IBM keyboard for that matching IBM terminal, it would have a good chance of working. This obviously is something Apple failed almost 40 years later.

                  Plus other than a level converting adapter to make it fit the hole and not fry anything, my old Model M from the late-80's is working well.
                  Last edited by kpedersen; 10-18-2020, 08:04 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                    It always amazes me that something like a keyboard can not be supported. This stuff was solved back in the 70s. What is that defective keyboard doing? Why is it sending incorrect signals and still being sold?
                    The standard keyboard functionality has worked with Linux but with the addition for Linux 5.10 to the Apple HID driver allows for function keys and media control functions to correctly work.

                    RTFA, man. RTFA. It was working correctly, at least with the Apple HID driver, but this keyboard added some extra features like friggin Function Keys.

                    Why is it so shocking that an Apple keyboard clone with extra features works with the Apple keyboard driver but needed some tweaks to get their extra keys working. Sounds to me like they solved That 70s Problem...but then some new keyboard came out with some new keys so the driver needed updating. New hardware....driver updates....nah, that can't be right, something fishy there

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