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Broadcom Has 200G Ethernet Link Speed Support Coming To Its Driver For Linux 5.10

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  • Broadcom Has 200G Ethernet Link Speed Support Coming To Its Driver For Linux 5.10

    Phoronix: Broadcom Has 200G Ethernet Link Speed Support Coming To Its Driver For Linux 5.10

    Broadcom engineers have prepared their Linux network driver infrastructure for supporting 200G link speeds...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag..._en-200G-Linux

  • #2
    Cool, but where is our consumer-grade 10G ethernet?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by mb_q View Post
      Cool, but where is our consumer-grade 10G ethernet?
      It got kneecapped. But there are some fine 2.5G options that can use a Cat 5e cable.

      Whatever happened to 400GbE and terabit?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mb_q View Post
        Cool, but where is our consumer-grade 10G ethernet?
        The current situation (as per pcpartpicker, filtering by ethernet) is that you either pay $500 instead of $200 for a motherboard that support 10G... or get a 10GbE nic under $50.

        Reasonably priced motherboards will give you 2.5G at best.

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        • #5
          99% of consumers use 1GbE because 99% of the equipment they connect too still use 1GbE. If/When the gods of retail home routers add those kinds of ports to their equipment instead of obsessing with draft unobtamium WiFi speeds, then you will see it in the OEM price tiers.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mb_q View Post
            Cool, but where is our consumer-grade 10G ethernet?
            The general business and consumer market is transitioning to 2.5 and upcoming hardware will support it. The Enterprise and enthusiast markets are transitioning to 10 and 5, depending on the price bracket purchasers want to operate in.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
              99% of consumers use 1GbE because 99% of the equipment they connect too still use 1GbE. If/When the gods of retail home routers add those kinds of ports to their equipment instead of obsessing with draft unobtamium WiFi speeds, then you will see it in the OEM price tiers.
              Actually is getting worse. A lot of mid range routers out there are regressing to 100mbps in lieu of those unobtamium WiFi speeds. I was shopping a while back for a new router, and I kinda got the impression you have to go higher end to get gigabit Ethernet.

              Now I'm highly temped in transforming my AM1 mobo in a router, since as long as it works I can upgrade it to newer stuff cheaper than buying a hot shit router.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by mb_q View Post
                Cool, but where is our consumer-grade 10G ethernet?
                You can buy add in cards for $60 and switches for $300. That's cheaper than the equipment I bought for 100 Mbps back in 1997 for LAN parties.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mb_q View Post
                  Cool, but where is our consumer-grade 10G ethernet?
                  One of the challenges is that the spec for 10GBaseT requires a lot of power (and power means heat) to support distances to 100M [while newer lithography has reduced the power requirements, the initial designs required 5W per port, so something like a 16 port 10GBaseT switch needed 80W *just* for the port transceivers, and that does not include the switching fabric which is also power hungry]. And to make matters even worse, the power for copper is higher than a SFP+ port supports (so a number of those SFP+ 10GBaseT transceivers are limited to shorter distances (30M) and therefore are not, technically, spec compliant).

                  But you can get prosumer grade 10G if you want it, just not at 1G pricing.

                  As others have mentioned, the new sweet spot for consumers is 2.5Gbps as it keeps the power and pricing lower.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mb_q View Post
                    Cool, but where is our consumer-grade 10G ethernet?
                    Somewhere around opensource drivers for Broadcom SoCs in cheap 1G routers.

                    Comment

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