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Sabrent USB 3.2 Enclosure + Sabrent Rocket Q 2TB NVMe SSD On Linux Performance

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  • Sabrent USB 3.2 Enclosure + Sabrent Rocket Q 2TB NVMe SSD On Linux Performance

    Phoronix: Sabrent USB 3.2 Enclosure + Sabrent Rocket Q 2TB NVMe SSD On Linux Performance

    For those looking at an NVMe PCIe M.2 solid-state drive enclosure for connecting to USB 3.1/3.2 systems, Sabrent offers a nice option with their EC-TFNB enclosure that is constructed out of aluminum, 100% tool-free, and runs well. I recently bought this Sabrent USB 3.2 enclosure along with the Sabrent Rocket Q 2TB NVMe solid-state drive, which offers nice performance for a PCIe 3.0 NVMe SSD and the 2TB capacity can be found for just about $250 USD.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=29405

  • #2
    Typos:

    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    The Sabrent EC-TFNB enclosure is all-alunimum and helps
    Originally posted by phoronix View Post
    The average temperature was similar in the two scenarios at 41~42 degrees Celsisus.

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    • #3
      Those M.2 enclosures/cases are really nice. I like having around a fast flashdrive and after losing a nice Lexar one, I bought a Corsair Voyager GT, mainly because mine first one (~15 years) was still working I was afraid to lose another too soon. But the performance was disappointing, with only about ~50 MB/s, against 150/170 MB/s of the Lexar.

      When looking for something faster, I was shocked with the prices. Anything over 200 MB/s was really expensive, even for modest 64GB models. So I stumbled upon those M.2 cases, and the prices were really cheap. I ended with the cheapest 120GB M.2 I could find (another Lexar), and a cheap Chinese slim aluminium case. Reads are about 400 MB/s on a USB 3.0 connection, way above similar priced, half capacity flashdrives. It is bulkier, sure, but still pocket friendly and easily up-gradable and fixable. I couldn't be happier.

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      • #4
        Low TBW ratings though:
        1TB=160, 2TB=530, 4TB=940

        For comparison, my Samsung SSD 860 EVO 4TB has a 2400TBW rating.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by macemoneta View Post
          Low TBW ratings though:
          1TB=160, 2TB=530, 4TB=940

          For comparison, my Samsung SSD 860 EVO 4TB has a 2400TBW rating.
          Another data point, my original intel X25-E drives (from 2010) in 64 GB capacity have 1000 TBW rating. 1 PB of writes to a 64 GB drive is a lot of cycles!

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          • #6
            FWIW: These Sabrent USB enclosures won't boot on a RaspPi4. Not a popular use case by any means, but for some reason the Sabrent's bridge chip just doesn't like those Pi USB3 ports.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
              When looking for something faster, I was shocked with the prices. Anything over 200 MB/s was really expensive, even for modest 64GB models. So I stumbled upon those M.2 cases, and the prices were really cheap. I ended with the cheapest 120GB M.2 I could find (another Lexar), and a cheap Chinese slim aluminium case. Reads are about 400 MB/s on a USB 3.0 connection, way above similar priced, half capacity flashdrives. It is bulkier, sure, but still pocket friendly and easily up-gradable and fixable. I couldn't be happier.
              I think that may also be due to the shelf life. USB flash drives tend to have slower NANDs which have longer lifespans.

              By the way, I wonder whether an Optane SSD would work properly over USB, and if so, whether USB3 speeds could potentially allow for over 10 years of shelf life.

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              • #8
                Don't these USB NVMe key's max out at about 1000MB/s on read/write? Never seen any go faster then that for whatever reason.

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                • #9
                  Any chance you could do a bulk write the drive (50GB+ in a single transfer) to show how the drive reacts to one of the limitations of QLC?

                  It's quite a painful experience to see an SSD transferring data slower than a HDD...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by theriddick View Post
                    Don't these USB NVMe key's max out at about 1000MB/s on read/write? Never seen any go faster then that for whatever reason.
                    That speed is around the limit of 10GBit/s USB 3.2 Gen 2. There is a faster version available: 20Gbit/s USB 3.2 Gen 2x2, but it's quite rare.

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