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Crucial P2 Performance On Ubuntu Linux - An Affordable 500GB NVMe SSD

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  • Crucial P2 Performance On Ubuntu Linux - An Affordable 500GB NVMe SSD

    Phoronix: Crucial P2 Performance On Ubuntu Linux - An Affordable 500GB NVMe SSD

    Last month Crucial introduced their P2 NVMe SSD series as their new low-cost successor to their prior P1 series. The Crucial P2 500GB NVMe solid-state drive retails for $60~65 USD which offers good value and yields better performance than their prior low-cost P1 SSDs.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=29156

  • #2
    If I'm going to get a budget SSD, I actually prefer the convenience of a 2.5 inch drive, as I have more cables I can use with it and more old systems I can throw it into to breath life into them.

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    • #3
      Well, the sequential write spec of 940 MB/s renders these utterly worthless to me. Even if Crucial gave them away for free I wouldn't take one. There are just so many, much faster, M.2 SSDs out there, starting at $20 more, that I'm not sure what market Crucial is hoping to target.

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      • #4
        The "volume market". Clearly, if you only need one or two, the price difference is small. But for businesses requiring tens or hundreds of units at a time, the difference becomes significant. And of course it also matters for system integrators, who can then sell cheaper PCs for people who avoid building their own, and this is a huge market.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by kneekoo View Post
          The "volume market". Clearly, if you only need one or two, the price difference is small. But for businesses requiring tens or hundreds of units at a time, the difference becomes significant. And of course it also matters for system integrators, who can then sell cheaper PCs for people who avoid building their own, and this is a huge market.
          Such budget SSDs hit the sweet-spot of retail market as well.
          The best seller 1T M.2 SSD on newegg is very similar to this product (checked a few weeks ago when I was shopping NVMe)

          It seems a lot of users just want a large M.2 drive as a better choice than the conventional 1T HDD, even if it's QLC.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by muncrief View Post
            Well, the sequential write spec of 940 MB/s renders these utterly worthless to me. Even if Crucial gave them away for free I wouldn't take one. There are just so many, much faster, M.2 SSDs out there, starting at $20 more, that I'm not sure what market Crucial is hoping to target.
            i'm currently waiting for the P1 1TB to fall below 100€ to pick it up - as an extension to my 970 evo plus 1tb system drive to load more games onto. It's still faster than a sata-ssd and more convenient to install. And for most games it should not make much of a difference between the 970 evo plus and the P1.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by muncrief View Post
              Well, the sequential write spec of 940 MB/s renders these utterly worthless to me. Even if Crucial gave them away for free I wouldn't take one. There are just so many, much faster, M.2 SSDs out there, starting at $20 more, that I'm not sure what market Crucial is hoping to target.
              If you care about these stats and just need one, this is not the product for you. I think, the target market is a low budget PC which would otherwise come with a mechanical drive. This is only possible at relatively low cost at decent capacities. In this case, this drive is a significant upgrade.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GruenSein View Post

                If you care about these stats and just need one, this is not the product for you. I think, the target market is a low budget PC which would otherwise come with a mechanical drive. This is only possible at relatively low cost at decent capacities. In this case, this drive is a significant upgrade.
                The other market would be SBCs that have NVMe ports or adapters like the ROCK64 series from Pine 64. You probably wouldn't want a high end NVMe drive for such a device especially if you're using it for low load use but don't trust SD cards not to wear out every few months (extremely common problem in Pis and other SD only devices).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Termy View Post
                  i'm currently waiting for the P1 1TB to fall below 100€ to pick it up - as an extension to my 970 evo plus 1tb system drive to load more games onto. It's still faster than a sata-ssd and more convenient to install. And for most games it should not make much of a difference between the 970 evo plus and the P1.
                  In the same boat here, SSD's are just too rich for me. All my PC's are on 7200 rpm HDD's. I think they'll eventually become affordable, but they have a ways to go yet.

                  At least for me, my various machines contain 2+ TB of data each. So that means a 4 TB drive is needed. And they are RAID-1 mirrored, so I need two 4 TB drives per machine. A good 4 TB ssd like Samsung 860 Pro is still a thousand bucks. So that's $2k per pc, or a total of $6k to upgrade my 3 PC's. Compare that with the HGST 4TB enterprise HDD's I'm using now, that were $69/ea as refurb from ebay.

                  So yeah, $414 for HDD vs $6k for SSD. Sigh, maybe some day.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                    Well, the sequential write spec of 940 MB/s renders these utterly worthless to me. Even if Crucial gave them away for free I wouldn't take one. There are just so many, much faster, M.2 SSDs out there, starting at $20 more, that I'm not sure what market Crucial is hoping to target.
                    Extremely few users are bottle-necked by the continuous write speed. Few programs are written that just aims at producing output files. And not too many users streams data into their system from a 10 Gbit link.

                    And when doing real work, it's more often number of I/O operations per second that matters instead of the continuous write speed. When copying a file, the system (and normally not the user) doesn't care if the last part of the write happens in the background.

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