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NVMe SSD Systems May Boot Slightly Quicker With Linux 5.7

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  • #21
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    .....if I only had pictures of my system from back in the day

    I actually did that + sawzalled a hole in the case because I didn't read the ATX specs correctly

    You can't get much more white trash geek than that system was

    Two damn power buttons...one for the motherboard and the other for extra hard drives and muh GPU

    It wasn't actually
    You could have used just one power button, use switch that has enough pins and can support 2 separate circuits with each switching.
    Or could have used this

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    • #22
      Originally posted by aht0 View Post

      You could have used just one power button, use switch that has enough pins and can support 2 separate circuits with each switching.
      Or could have used this
      i was younger, broke, and determined to get a pile of incompatible stuff working because it's what I had available. What was surprising was how long I was able to make use of a Core2Quad and an Nvidia 8400GS.

      The 260x I bought was a godsend compared to that.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
        Dell T5500. Dual Xeons with 48GB ECC. One Gen before Sandy and one gen before EFI was mandated.

        Some days I feel that I have the last worth-a-shit BIOS-based Intel system.

        But I only reboot when either rpm-ostree updates or I'm switching over to Windows to play Call of Duty (at least I'm honest about the game).

        I'm tired of rebooting as much so I'm gonna be picking up an RX 550 or RX 560 for my desktop and use my RX 580 with VMs. Need one w/o a power adapter due to having to use my two six pins with an eight pin adapter cause I has no free GPU powers
        If you can spare a graphics card and related graphics power from your workstation, running Win virtually in kvm and graphics (PCIe) passthough works really well to a degree where I don't bother with win dual boot anymore. Conceptually, I'd like GPU virtualization more but I didn't have much luck so far. I think KVM and spice are starting to have OpenGL support.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by mppix View Post

          If you can spare a graphics card and related graphics power from your workstation, running Win virtually in kvm and graphics (PCIe) passthough works really well to a degree where I don't bother with win dual boot anymore. Conceptually, I'd like GPU virtualization more but I didn't have much luck so far. I think KVM and spice are starting to have OpenGL support.
          That's my plan. Pick up a cheapo RX 550 or 560 for basic desktop needs and use my current RX 580 with VMs.

          I, too, would love to buy a stupid powerful GPU and divvy it up into 3 or 4 GPUs via GPU virtualization.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Danny3 View Post
            Good job.
            I always wondered why modern computers that have 8+ cpu cores running at 3.5+ GHz with RAM at 3200+ GHz and SSD with a transfer speed of 300-500+ MB/s boot so slow.
            I mean why so powerful computers cannot boot in less than 5 seconds ?
            If you use a distro such as Ubuntu (or even Arch), you might have easy wins by disabling services you don't use, such as LVM, which easily eats up 300+ ms of my boot time before disabling it on SSDs.

            Also, saying that 200ms is not a significant amount of boot time is insane, considering my arch install on my ancient laptop with not the best SATA 3 SSD consistently boots in under 4.5s (systemd makes boot times inconsistent, so I have to account for worst case scenarios). In my suboptimal case, that could be up to 5%, which is statistically significant. I understand that some people might still have boot times worthy of a 5400 RPM hard disk with a fast NVMe drive (Ubuntu boots in about 40 seconds on my work laptop, for instance, while I can get ~13s on a celeron m laptop with an old 5400 RPM hard disk), but some have spent a couple of minutes to shave down their boot times.

            Using faster hardware as an excuse to be lazier and make less efficient software has no justification, so expecting that faster storage and CPUs will keep boot times similar is just silly.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

              .....if I only had pictures of my system from back in the day

              I actually did that + sawzalled a hole in the case because I didn't read the ATX specs correctly

              You can't get much more white trash geek than that system was

              Two damn power buttons...one for the motherboard and the other for extra hard drives and muh GPU

              It wasn't actually
              I just bridged the 'turn on' signal from the one switch to the 20 pin PSU cables.

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              • #27
                5-6 sec on Ryzen 7 3700X with Kingston A2000 1TB NVMe. I can't figure how much fast will be 5.7 kernel.

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