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Linux Kernel's Floppy Disk Code Is Seeing Improvements In 2020

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I think there's still some utility in having floppy disk code in the kernel. Old computers still exist, and floppies might be the most convenient way to move data to them while airgapping them properly.

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  • programmerjake
    replied
    I think I still have a 5.25in 360k floppy somewhere...

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  • DRanged
    replied
    Beginning of last year I needed something off a 3.5 floppy and as I didn't have one anymore got myself an external USB floppy drive that worked surprisingly well.
    Ah also the fond memories of using a scsi Plextor Plexwiter PX-R412Ci with caddy as it was the only one you could use to boot and install AIX on RS6000 models 7012-320 and 7012-360 unless you wanted to pay the IBM premium for a CD-Drive.

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  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by skeetre View Post
    I still use floppies at work. I'll be glad for any improvements to their functionality. And if you have to ask why I use floppies, they are removable, non-flash based memory, and can be write protected. Perfect for transferring data from one network to another. Lots of rpms are small enough to fit on a single floppy, config files, all kinds of things that aren't worth wasting a cd/dvd on. And you can reuse the heck out of them.

    Zip drives and Jazz drives were the bomb!
    You can mount flash drives as read-only. But even then, you said "transferring data from one network to another". Unless these networks are isolated from each other, why not just use the network to transfer files?

    I personally have had data corruption issues with zip drives. Jazz were pretty cool, at least in concept.

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  • rene
    replied
    someone could fix sparc64 oopsing while accessing the floppy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAAJG0UlRxU

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
    Interesting. Although many modern main boards have deprecated this kind of device nowadays.
    People running Linux 32bit will probably need this still

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  • skeetre
    replied
    I still use floppies at work. I'll be glad for any improvements to their functionality. And if you have to ask why I use floppies, they are removable, non-flash based memory, and can be write protected. Perfect for transferring data from one network to another. Lots of rpms are small enough to fit on a single floppy, config files, all kinds of things that aren't worth wasting a cd/dvd on. And you can reuse the heck out of them.

    Zip drives and Jazz drives were the bomb!

    Leave a comment:


  • M@GOid
    replied
    Yeah, the race to the bottom came with high unreliability of the disks. People say that even floppies weren't all that bad in the 80's. Memories of frustration while trying to access data on some disks (CDs too) made me a early converted to flashdrives. I still have my first one, a blue, 1GB Corsair Flash Voyager (still works!).

    I remember a day doing a 45 min bus ride to a friend's house to bring back a pack of floppy disks full of arcade ROMs (MAME), only to find out that disk 5 or 6 was corrupted... (in the "single big Zip file in multiple disks" days). Still makes me mad 20 years latter.

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  • ssokolow
    replied
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
    schmidtbag
    quikee

    I confess that I had never seen on of these (in cartridge form) until last month. And I'm one of those types that like to learn about obscure hardware stuff.
    It also made me kind of sad to learn it never really took off, because for PC use it sure looks a lot better than traditional DVDs, being properly protected against scratches and dirt, while also had the characteristic of being used like a floppy disk or HDD, no stinky writing software needed (I'm looking at you Nero).
    The use of caddies actually dates back to the earliest days of CD-ROM, when the stuff you were likely to get on them could cost equivalent to $1000 a disc or more in today's money. They fell out of use as the cost of what was being protected fell. I've got some period caddies that I remember seeing used with CD-enabled Macintoshes as a kid as nostalgic display pieces.

    EDIT: ...the exact model of caddy pictured in the photos schmidtbag linked.

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  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
    I confess that I had never seen on of these (in cartridge form) until last month. And I'm one of those types that like to learn about obscure hardware stuff.
    It also made me kind of sad to learn it never really took off, because for PC use it sure looks a lot better than traditional DVDs, being properly protected against scratches and dirt, while also had the characteristic of being used like a floppy disk or HDD, no stinky writing software needed (I'm looking at you Nero).
    If you like quirky hardware and didn't know about DVD-RAMs coming in cartridges, I'm not sure if you're aware of these:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magneto-optical_drive
    and these (normal CD ROMs that came in caddies):
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...addies_JPG.jpg
    https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-a1x7...159202.jpg?c=2

    The problem with DVD-RAM (with or without cartridges) is they were kinda expensive.

    Leave a comment:

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