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Linux Kernel's Floppy Disk Code Is Seeing Improvements In 2020

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  • Linux Kernel's Floppy Disk Code Is Seeing Improvements In 2020

    Phoronix: Linux Kernel's Floppy Disk Code Is Seeing Improvements In 2020

    While many would argue it's past due for the Linux kernel's floppy disk code to be gutted from the mainline code-base, instead it's seeing improvements in 2020 ahead of the Linux 5.7 kernel... The same kernel where Intel stabilized Tiger Lake graphics, AMD preparing Zen 3 support, a new exFAT driver, and a multitude of other modern improvements is also now seeing floppy work...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...y-Improvements

  • #2
    This magnetic stuff is so obsolete. I prefer my floppy disks to be optical and shiny.



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-RAM

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    • #3
      Hey, we might not have asked for an update in floppy disk code, but at least we still got some old crap removed. I can't complain about that.

      Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
      This magnetic stuff is so obsolete. I prefer my floppy disks to be optical and shiny.
      On a serious note... DVD-RAM is actually not a bad option for archival purposes, assuming it's enough space for you. It's decently reliable.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
        This magnetic stuff is so obsolete. I prefer my floppy disks to be optical and shiny.
        Hah yes, I have one DVD-RAM media somewhere, but not inside a cartridge and it is also dual-sided. It's quite good as you can just read/write it like a floppy (no need to burn it) and with a longer life expectancy, because of phase-change metals used instead of organic dye as in normal DVD+-R medias.

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        • #5
          Is it safe using them these days? We need to prevent robots from getting their cold metal hands on the floppy diks.

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          • #6
            Interesting. Although many modern main boards have deprecated this kind of device nowadays.

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            • #7
              schmidtbag
              quikee

              I confess that I had never seen on of these (in cartridge form) until last month. And I'm one of those types that like to learn about obscure hardware stuff.
              It also made me kind of sad to learn it never really took off, because for PC use it sure looks a lot better than traditional DVDs, being properly protected against scratches and dirt, while also had the characteristic of being used like a floppy disk or HDD, no stinky writing software needed (I'm looking at you Nero).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                I confess that I had never seen on of these (in cartridge form) until last month. And I'm one of those types that like to learn about obscure hardware stuff.
                It also made me kind of sad to learn it never really took off, because for PC use it sure looks a lot better than traditional DVDs, being properly protected against scratches and dirt, while also had the characteristic of being used like a floppy disk or HDD, no stinky writing software needed (I'm looking at you Nero).
                If you like quirky hardware and didn't know about DVD-RAMs coming in cartridges, I'm not sure if you're aware of these:
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magneto-optical_drive
                and these (normal CD ROMs that came in caddies):
                https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...addies_JPG.jpg
                https://cdn11.bigcommerce.com/s-a1x7...159202.jpg?c=2

                The problem with DVD-RAM (with or without cartridges) is they were kinda expensive.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                  schmidtbag
                  quikee

                  I confess that I had never seen on of these (in cartridge form) until last month. And I'm one of those types that like to learn about obscure hardware stuff.
                  It also made me kind of sad to learn it never really took off, because for PC use it sure looks a lot better than traditional DVDs, being properly protected against scratches and dirt, while also had the characteristic of being used like a floppy disk or HDD, no stinky writing software needed (I'm looking at you Nero).
                  The use of caddies actually dates back to the earliest days of CD-ROM, when the stuff you were likely to get on them could cost equivalent to $1000 a disc or more in today's money. They fell out of use as the cost of what was being protected fell. I've got some period caddies that I remember seeing used with CD-enabled Macintoshes as a kid as nostalgic display pieces.

                  EDIT: ...the exact model of caddy pictured in the photos schmidtbag linked.

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, the race to the bottom came with high unreliability of the disks. People say that even floppies weren't all that bad in the 80's. Memories of frustration while trying to access data on some disks (CDs too) made me a early converted to flashdrives. I still have my first one, a blue, 1GB Corsair Flash Voyager (still works!).

                    I remember a day doing a 45 min bus ride to a friend's house to bring back a pack of floppy disks full of arcade ROMs (MAME), only to find out that disk 5 or 6 was corrupted... (in the "single big Zip file in multiple disks" days). Still makes me mad 20 years latter.

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