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Linux 5.7 Picking Up Support For A High-End USB-C Audio Interface

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  • Linux 5.7 Picking Up Support For A High-End USB-C Audio Interface

    Phoronix: Linux 5.7 Picking Up Support For A High-End USB-C Audio Interface

    More high-end audio gear is finally transitioning from Firewire to USB-C and one of these new high-end audio interfaces will be supported by the Linux 5.7 kernel this spring...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...us-1810c-USB-C

  • #2
    Kudo to the developper, but it's really a shame that hardware manufacturers don't consider Linux as a viable platform to build a recording studio.

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    • #3
      spykes It is a shame for sure! I don't know of any audio interfaces that do not have any quirks at all. Except Behringer's line of audio interfaces? Perhaps?

      The support coming in at just over 600 lines of new code is queued as part of sound-next as the ALSA/sound changes slated for Linux 5.7 after the completion of the current Linux 5.7 cycle.
      ...current Linux 5.6 cycle. 5.6 has not been released yet until after rc7 or rc8.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by spykes View Post
        Kudo to the developper, but it's really a shame that hardware manufacturers don't consider Linux as a viable platform to build a recording studio.
        That's because there are too damn many general purpose desktop distributions. So many distributions these days are the same thing with a different package manager...Gnome, systemd, and Pulseaudio. Even Tumbleweed and Manjaro might as well be the same thing, different package manager...Plasma, systemd, Pulseaudio.

        Fedora had that Jam spin that used JACK audio...but nobody wanted to step up and maintain it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
          That's because there are too damn many general purpose desktop distributions. ...
          Fedora had that Jam spin that used JACK audio...but nobody wanted to step up and maintain it.
          I'm not sure that's a good excuse. Almost all of these distros use the linux kernel, the same glibc libraries, etc.; low lever audio support doesn't care about desktop environment, package manager, or most of the other stuff that differentiates distributions. The problem is the audio world is largely Mac-based for historical reasons.

          Changing the subject, what is that jam spin that used JACK audio -- what did this do?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pgoetz View Post

            I'm not sure that's a good excuse. Almost all of these distros use the linux kernel, the same glibc libraries, etc.; low lever audio support doesn't care about desktop environment, package manager, or most of the other stuff that differentiates distributions. The problem is the audio world is largely Mac-based for historical reasons.

            Changing the subject, what is that jam spin that used JACK audio -- what did this do?
            It was Fedora + JACK/ALSA/Pulse + KDE + a bunch of Linux audio programs. Based on what little I've read about it, it should have also been using a real-time patched kernel, had KWin swapped with tildearrow's fork, and other tweaks here and there to decrease latency and increase responsiveness with an eventual move to a Silverblue base...at least that's the stuff I imagined that I'd do if I were to step up and maintain it.

            But you're right that the desktop/package manager don't care. What does matter is using the right setup to get really low latency for real-time audio effects and being able to strum a chord and sing a word and have them be in sync when the PC records it and having a dedicated spin and maintainer who cares about that status quo.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pgoetz View Post
              Changing the subject, what is that jam spin that used JACK audio -- what did this do?
              https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Fedora_Jam_Audio_Spin
              https://phoronix.com/scan.php?page=n...Scientific-EOL

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              • #8
                Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                Fedora had that Jam spin that used JACK audio...but nobody wanted to step up and maintain it.
                Hopefully very soon this should be solved by using pipewire.

                I don't know if it is still the case, but default JACK replacement was being aimed for Fedora 32 with default replacement for puleaudio slightly later down the line.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by spykes View Post
                  Kudo to the developper, but it's really a shame that hardware manufacturers don't consider Linux as a viable platform to build a recording studio.
                  FWIW. This is not really studio equipment, it's more for the road. There are recording studios running mostly Linux, but mostly stationary ones.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by You- View Post
                    Hopefully very soon this should be solved by using pipewire.

                    I don't know if it is still the case, but default JACK replacement was being aimed for Fedora 32 with default replacement for puleaudio slightly later down the line.
                    I disabled PulseAudio via systemctl (.service and .socket) and started Pipewire as a user, but there isn't any documentation about how to switch to different audio card using Pipewire, so I went back to PulseAudio. Heck, I can't start Jack when using NVIDIA HDMI audio connected to my receiver, but then I don't expect to get low latency from there... I have a NVIDIA GTX 960.

                    I went into Pipewire's website which claimed to include documentation, but when I click in "Pipewire wiki," the link took me to GitHub page.

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