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Two Decades Late: Mainline Linux Kernel Getting Keyboard / Mouse Driver For SGI Octane

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  • #31
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    You mean Ubuntu seriously discussed for their own little hobby distro.

    I'm not seeing a Linux kernel mailing list link for that discussion so everyone else would have been unaffected (for example Debian)
    It was a contrast of the relative worth of 20+ year old technologies.

    Wish I had a hobby with 32% Linux desktop market share that earns $110 million, clearing $6.2 million in profit.

    Someone pinged me to tell me that the ISS is running Debian IA-32 in some of their racks. As long as the ISS stays afloat, it will exist on the NASA dime.



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    • #32
      Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

      Technically the kernel is dropping a *type* of 32-bit support:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X32_ABI

      That said, I don't know if they have followed through with it yet. It is deprecated at least.

      I wonder if more people use this than SGI hardware.
      Just a note that I have both x32 enabled in my 5.5-rc kernel and in my Gentoo userspace. It was always sort of useful in *theory*, but that never panned out for general use that I know of. You can still download a modern stage3 x32 gentoo image and run a whole x32 only system if you want. Might be good for routers or something embedded, but a lot of desktop stuff will not build/run on that. It is possible to enable base support for x86-64, x86-32 and x86-x32 all together, which I may be one of the few people to have done(?). (This basicly means the compiler/tools and glibc support all 3 arches.) Most people only care about the x86-32, for running old software and wine.

      Now, I also have the aforementioned stage3 x32 image, which I have been playing with in a chroot. It seems pretty fast and lean, seems like maybe there should be some of those hard-core bloat complaining people out there running this with a tiling window manager or such

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      • #33
        Originally posted by edwaleni View Post
        It was a contrast of the relative worth of 20+ year old technologies.
        It was misleading bullshit and you know it.

        Wish I had a hobby with 32% Linux desktop market share that earns $110 million, clearing $6.2 million in profit.
        Wish I had all the money Shuttleworth pulled out of his ass and burned to keep Canonical alive for a decade of not making any profit at all

        Someone pinged me to tell me that the ISS is running Debian IA-32 in some of their racks
        How does this even matter with the original statement about multiarch support? (i.e. run 32bit applications on a 64bit OS)

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        • #34
          Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
          It kinda is.

          This is true. However why bloat the mainline kernel with this work? This might interest a dozen people worldwide ansd that is if they can even find one of these workstations.


          I’m not sure I see the point. I can go to the Henry Ford to look at machine from the dawn of the Industrial Age and maybe even see one in action. Such machinery is very visual and dramatically different than today’s hardware. Contrast this to a computer, an abstract box that differs little from recent hardware. Further what is there to watch if the computer is running?

          we need museums for our tech heritage but it is hard to see why a running computer makes a difference. This especially if the operating system is a recent Linux build. It is only an Otsne in name if it is running Linux.
          Ok, at this point I will want you to define what you think bloat is.

          this code will not be compiled for your x86 boxes, so there is 0 runtime penalty.

          If there is a maintainer for the platform, then the maintenance burden cannot be considered bloat.

          I do believe that this is entirely within the scope of the Linux kernel project (it runs on all the things) so - definitely not scope creep.

          I can definitely see the "it's not going to be useful to many people" argument, but maybe that's not the point. The author of these patches is building skills in bringing up a an architecture - skills that can translate over to other architectures and possibly better employment opportunities.

          In short, It doesn't hurt and we will all potentially benefit from it in the long run.

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          • #35
            Here a working Indigo2 with Impact graphics.
            Once in a while I start it, just to be amazed by the 3D presentation (Inventor) possibilities it has.
            Running Irix, and I wouldn't want it otherwise.

            Also, Linux has never been an option, something with the memory.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              It was misleading bullshit and you know it.

              Wish I had all the money Shuttleworth pulled out of his ass and burned to keep Canonical alive for a decade of not making any profit at all

              How does this even matter with the original statement about multiarch support? (i.e. run 32bit applications on a 64bit OS)
              Why so caustic in your responses?

              So what, I see it different than you.

              Do you need to take a Linus like break for some anger management? You post like you are always pissed off. Whats up?

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              • #37
                This code make sens only for retro computing, not for hardware of today. Unless someone trying to reverse engineering SGI Octane workstation. like in https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-NkXthbbA-M
                https://github.com/alfikpl/ao486, a 486 SX compatible equivalent.
                Last edited by onicsis; 25 January 2020, 04:01 PM.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                  I have a broken Indy in the attic but even when they were modern they were fairly rare.
                  Nonsense, when they were modern, you could see them used in various vendor demos at trade shows pretty regularly.

                  Originally posted by kpedersen View Post
                  They were almost as awkward to get hold of back then as a server-grade ARM board is today.
                  Also nonsense, all you had to do was call SGI and order one. It was a single vendor solution. Not any harder than ordering a pizza. I worked for years servicing SGI equipment back in the 90's and early 2000's and I never once heard any of my customers have any trouble with procurement.
                  Last edited by torsionbar28; 25 January 2020, 05:40 PM.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by glwillia View Post
                    It's interesting, but I can't imagine why anyone would run Linux on one of these. People do use these (the SGI retrocomputing scene is very active, and MIPS/IRIX machines still command a fair bit of money), but the whole point is to run IRIX and vintage applications. If you just want a Linux machine you can do that a lot faster and cheaper buying a 10-year-old amd64 box.
                    For sure, Linux on an SGI MIPS box is full on pointless. IRIX was very well optimized for the hardware while Linux is not even close. Also last time I looked, Linux doesn't support any of the SGI graphics hardware very well, and seeing as these SGI machines are made for visualization, and accelerated 3D specifically, it defeats the whole point of using this hardware.

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                    • #40
                      And on a completly related note, to whomever mentioned 'Henry Ford museum' and 'start of the industrial revolution' in the same sentemce needs to go do some reading.

                      All Ford did was make cars affordable for more people.
                      Hi

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