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Benchmarking Five ~$30 USD Solid-State Drives Under Ubuntu Linux

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  • #21
    Originally posted by devius View Post

    A few months ago I got all the data out of a MFM HDD from 1988, so there's that.
    Jeez, well done. I have an old 20MB (Wooo!) disk with old FreeBSD 2.0 code on it that I wish I could get at. Have no ISA bus, no 486 so it will stay in storage as a museum piece.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by elatllat View Post
      The SQL results I did not expect...
      Which one?

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post

        Which one?
        Probably how the Crucial drive seems to be extremely optimized for SQL tasks while sucking at the others. It looks like it's a datacenter drive that they just didn't bother to adjust for desktop. Or maybe they're secretly targeting SSD RAID datacenter applications?

        I actually got one of those, to sour grape for a minute, on the belief that it'd be more reliable, after I've had some m4s last... a long time, and an OCZ that bit it after a year.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
          Jeez, well done. I have an old 20MB (Wooo!) disk with old FreeBSD 2.0 code on it that I wish I could get at. Have no ISA bus, no 486 so it will stay in storage as a museum piece.
          Thanks!

          I had to use a somewhat modern enough PC that was able to run the software I needed (ddrescue) while also allowing the usage of an 8-bit interface card. I used a Compaq Deskpro Pentium III 600Mhz with a Intel BX chipset that still has ISA slots and Fedora 8. I had to recompile a version of the kernel with MFM HDD support. It was a lot of work!

          Send me a message if you really want to recover the data.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by devius View Post

            Thanks!

            I had to use a somewhat modern enough PC that was able to run the software I needed (ddrescue) while also allowing the usage of an 8-bit interface card. I used a Compaq Deskpro Pentium III 600Mhz with a Intel BX chipset that still has ISA slots and Fedora 8. I had to recompile a version of the kernel with MFM HDD support. It was a lot of work!

            Send me a message if you really want to recover the data.
            Thanks for the offer.
            My disk in question has freebsd on it already, so it's only a matter of sourcing hardware. Laziness prevents me doing that.
            The software's probably on one of the hundreds of floppies I have; haven't had a floppy drive in a machine for over 10 years.

            In your case it's a pity you didn't run freebsd (yet another reason):
            http://ftp-archive.freebsd.org/pub/F...releases/i386/

            They even have their forebear 386bsd available.
            Of course this is why a base plus binaries OS is superior.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by caligula View Post
              How about no.

              First, people usually purchase large capacity 3.5" drives for archiving purposes. The SSDs are generally 2.5" or M.2 and have relatively low capacity. Some USB HDDs are 2.5". Some data centers make use of 2.5" disks. But in general, we're talking about two radically different product segments here with totally different physical dimensions and storage capacity. SSDs are usually bought for the purpose of storing your OS and applications. When discussing shelf life, those HDDs are usually set up for backups or archiving. Totally different use cases. It's like comparing tanks or tractors with bicycles.

              There are perfectly good reasons to use SSDs these days. For example, the laptops have twice as long battery life. The machines don't lose data when you drop them. They're silent. They weigh less. Significantly better performance and boot/launch time. For ordinary users, they could even offer longer MTBF. The pricing is very competitive.
              I agree, but as Buntolo said, the issue is when the user leaves the computer off for stretches of time.
              I want non-techies to have computers that aid them without getting in their way, and reducing power consumption is one of the ways to get there (another is by making the computer as small as possible, without sacrificing functionality, nor becoming expensive).

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