Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Karbon 300 Is A Compact, Rugged PC That Ships With Linux As An Option

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #11
    Originally posted by tuxd3v View Post
    They needed to be at least -70 to +50C.. but even so, I already read that sometimes -70...is not enough
    I think metals start to brake at <= - 50 C
    In Yakutia majority of their usual thermometers start getting stuck at about -55°C, so that is likely a point where lower quality metals choke. Probably normal people have no way to know nor to prove how much lower it really goes than this

    Thermometers are like this, so down to -70°C is standard there



    On -40° everything functioning normally, kids goes to school... only bellow these -55-60°C everything stops

    But this Computers cannot survive there, not even closest..
    Of course it can't, not even military class can't... probably needs to be maded of diamonds or whatever

    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
    So you're telling me that people actually work in -70C environments?
    He, he, nope, but down to let say about -55°C you can be pretty sure some do
    Last edited by dungeon; 27 March 2019, 02:23 PM.

    Comment


    • #12
      Thanks for the explanation everyone, I had never heard the term "rugged" to refer to industrial-grade hardware so I wasn't getting the point of this.

      Comment


      • #13
        Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
        So you're telling me that people actually work in -70C environments? I'm pretty sure that at those temperatures, they will have the stove or heaters running, so the house temperature is actually warmer than -70C anyway...
        No stove in gulag, only work.

        Comment


        • #14
          Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
          So you're telling me that people actually work in -70C environments? I'm pretty sure that at those temperatures, they will have the stove or heaters running, so the house temperature is actually warmer than -70C anyway...
          No. Many industrial pc's are used as embedded devices, i.e. they monitor and/or control some kind of equipment, and are often installed in non climate controlled spaces that may not be occupied by people. It's not necessarily a "personal computer" used by one individual who is sitting right there.

          As for the temperature rating, it's called a 'safety margin'. If you're installing this thing somewhere that sees -40C, you don't want equipment that's rated to -40C. Because what if tomorrow it's -41C? You want something rated a fair bit beyond the intended use case.
          torsionbar28
          Senior Member
          Last edited by torsionbar28; 27 March 2019, 03:32 PM.

          Comment


          • #15
            Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
            No. Many industrial pc's are used as embedded devices, i.e. they monitor and/or control some kind of equipment
            To give some context:
            I've seen PCs like that commonly used to run image recognition software in automation setups (telling the system if an object is in the right place, or if some type of cut was done deep enough and similar).
            They can be used to run any kind of data-processing "thinking" task while the rest of the automation around them is actually running a real-time OS and controlling movement of robots or servomotors. And the whole machine will wait for their "good" or "not good" answer to decide what to do next.

            Comment


            • #16
              Originally posted by Vistaus View Post

              So you're telling me that people actually work in -70C environments? I'm pretty sure that at those temperatures, they will have the stove or heaters running, so the house temperature is actually warmer than -70C anyway...
              At -70C, you can't even turn your car motor off, it needs to run 24/7..or it will never start running any more, and you will die, in the cold..
              Also at -70C, you shouldn't breath directly from the cold, you need to do it indirectly, if not, you will die.
              If you do, do it for brief periods of time..and stay in the Street maximum 10-20 Minutes..

              Of course work in OpenAir, cannot be done, above certain temps, usually above -50C/-55C,
              But nowadays people work, in Closed spaces, and inside its a lot warmer.. thanks god.

              Remember, not everybody is capable of withstand this temperatures..probably more than 80% of world population can't.

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by dungeon View Post
                Thermometers are like this, so down to -70°C is standard there
                Yeah, standard is -70/+50C,
                Its very difficult to get materials to work, its not because they are bad, they are the finest ones..

                I remember a documentary, were a Scientist brought a Thermometer, ( That was advertised to be to Artic conditions.. it was very expensive ),
                He travelled to Russia to Yakutia, at -55C, even the lcd display broke into 2 pieces..

                Good quality Steel pieces, bellow -50C/-55C also starts to brake.. its ruthless mother nature..
                Because of that,
                Usually works outside that needs metal structures, stops above that, because you never know, when it will brake..

                But were not even good quality Steel can work,
                There are some bunch of amazing humans that can survive, probably millions of years of DNA evolution...its the only explanation..

                I would die in less than 5 minutes for sure there..

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                  As for the temperature rating, it's called a 'safety margin'. If you're installing this thing somewhere that sees -40C, you don't want equipment that's rated to -40C. Because what if tomorrow it's -41C? You want something rated a fair bit beyond the intended use case.
                  But you can never be certain anyway. I mean, look at this winter alone: NYC was exposed to arctic weather for a couple of days, which was very abnormal for NYC. Should they have prepared and bought equipment rated at -70C because of that?

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
                    NYC was exposed to arctic weather for a couple of days, which was very abnormal for NYC. Should they have prepared and bought equipment rated at -70C because of that?
                    Depends. There is a difference between operating and non-operating temperature. If it is feasible to just switch off or acceptable to endure malfunction of the device for a few abnormal days, then it doesn't need to be rated at -70°C operating temperature.

                    If however a device would suffer permanent damage by being exposed to low temperatures even if switched off, then even rare weather conditions need to be taken into account.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X