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FSF Certifies A USB Microphone For Respecting Your Freedom Plus Some Network Adapters

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    I'm being sacarstic. Of course I know about that. It's just downright aggrevating that only two USB 80211ac chipsets are compatible with a mainline kernel when there are more than 30 out there and we are moving on to 80211ax.
    Neither of which have open firmware (Qualcomm does have third party firmware from Candela Tech but they signed an NDA with Qualcomm) so neither will ever go into the whitelist of the FSF.

    Leave a comment:


  • andyprough
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    Then you shouldn't even be on this forum.

    You should have thrashed all your mobile phones and computers because everything from the GSM standard to the ARM hardware and the x86/x64 hardware can be backdoored.
    Somebody died and made you forum boss? You haven't a clue what the purpose of free software is, do you? You think the only purpose is to avoid backdoors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kayote
    replied
    Originally posted by Almindor View Post

    Yes, let's completely ignore there's a problem in the fundamental principle of how hardware is created and sold. Let's all put on our "everything is fine" masks and be happy little customers.
    well the problem is this, is open source really more secure that proprietary software? one will tend to think that yes, but on the other hand there are some examples that is not always like that , one being WPA2 encryption vulnerability which windows was mostly unaffected.
    Last edited by Kayote; 03-21-2019, 11:03 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Almindor
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

    Then you shouldn't even be on this forum.

    You should have thrashed all your mobile phones and computers because everything from the GSM standard to the ARM hardware and the x86/x64 hardware can be backdoored.
    Yes, let's completely ignore there's a problem in the fundamental principle of how hardware is created and sold. Let's all put on our "everything is fine" masks and be happy little customers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kayote
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

    Then you shouldn't even be on this forum.

    You should have thrashed all your mobile phones and computers because everything from the GSM standard to the ARM hardware and the x86/x64 hardware can be backdoored.
    yeah right is everything is soo unsecure, why hasn't ISIS took over world communications?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by Filiprino View Post

    Guess what, you should care a little more. Have you read about those nasty Intel chipset backdoors lately?
    Then you shouldn't even be on this forum.

    You should have thrashed all your mobile phones and computers because everything from the GSM standard to the ARM hardware and the x86/x64 hardware can be backdoored.

    Leave a comment:


  • Filiprino
    replied
    The rest of us just want our computers to work and care very little about open firmware whether or not it's loaded by a driver or built into the device's ROM.
    Guess what, you should care a little more. Have you read about those nasty Intel chipset backdoors lately?

    Leave a comment:


  • GraysonPeddie
    replied
    PCIe Gigabit Ethernet Card Dual Port (TPE-1000MPCIE)
    Would be nice to see an FSF-approved quad gigabit card so I can replace a 4-port Intel gigabit card. But then I don't think there is any FSF-approved APUs out there that make use of a GPU embedded inside a CPU. I have an AMD Ryzen 3 2200G for my server.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonadow
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post


    It's not quite that simple. The problem with all wireless devices for the past 15 years or so is that very few of them, mostly Atheros, use open firmware. They all use binary blobs that must be loaded by the driver on device initialization. Many devices are like that, including modern video cards, some wired NICs, even webcams. That's not acceptable to the FSF and some of the more extremist libre software/hardware advocates.

    The rest of us just want our computers to work and care very little about open firmware whether or not it's loaded by a driver or built into the device's ROM.
    .
    I'm being sacarstic. Of course I know about that. It's just downright aggrevating that only two USB 80211ac chipsets are compatible with a mainline kernel when there are more than 30 out there and we are moving on to 80211ax.

    Things aren't any better on the M.2 / PCIe side as well. The only 80211ac M2/PCIe chipsets that are reliably compatible with a mainline kernel are Intel and Qualcomm, and they make up only half the market. Realtek, Mediatek and Broadcom make up the other 50% and their compatibility is pathetic. Even Realtek, the so-called best of the worst, has spotty M2/PCIe 80211ac compatibility with mainline kernels.

    Leave a comment:


  • stormcrow
    replied
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post

    Is this some kind of joke?

    Oh wait, it's no joke. WiFi compatibility in Linux is so dated that only two USB 80211ac chipsets (out of more than 30) are usable with a mainline kernel from the last four months.

    The only option available for true USB WiFi compatibility is to use 20 year old hardware. I get it.

    It's not quite that simple. The problem with all wireless devices for the past 15 years or so is that very few of them, mostly Atheros, use open firmware. They all use binary blobs that must be loaded by the driver on device initialization. Many devices are like that, including modern video cards, some wired NICs, even webcams. That's not acceptable to the FSF and some of the more extremist libre software/hardware advocates.

    The rest of us just want our computers to work and care very little about open firmware whether or not it's loaded by a driver or built into the device's ROM.

    Michael is right about the USB audio thing, though. Simple USB audio compliant devices don't need external firmware, they "just work". Few device manufacturers are going to care about what the FSF thinks about their device, if they're even aware of the organization, so even otherwise free software friendly devices (ones that are standards compliant) aren't going to be listed by the FSF.

    Leave a comment:

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