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ASUS ZenScreen MB16AC USB-C Display Is Working Much Better With Modern Linux Distros

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  • #11
    Can this screen be used with a pen? If so, how is the pen experience on Linux?

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    • #12
      Originally posted by sarmad View Post
      Can this screen be used with a pen? If so, how is the pen experience on Linux?
      No it cannot. This is just a screen.

      The description mentions a "smart pen hole" but that's a hole you can place a pen into to act as a support (which is a bit too ghetto for a 250$ device like this, but hey it will work for emergencies). It also seems to come with a branded (normal) pen in the box if you look at reviews.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        No it cannot. This is just a screen.

        The description mentions a "smart pen hole" but that's a hole you can place a pen into to act as a support (which is a bit too ghetto for a 250$ device like this, but hey it will work for emergencies). It also seems to come with a branded (normal) pen in the box if you look at reviews.
        I call that cheating while still being legal. I'm guessing they made the hole hoping that some people will buy it thinking: if it has a pen hole it must be for the pen you use to write on the screen, especially if that hole is for a "smart" pen.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by sarmad View Post
          I call that cheating while still being legal.
          I would call that cheating, period. They are safe from legal issues, but it's still plain obvious what their intent is.

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          • #15
            Why would it not be recommended for gaming? This might not be a low-latency, low-persistence adaptative sync display, but it would probably do just fine in DisplayPort mode.

            If your computer supports DisplayPort USB-C alternate mode (usually there's a DP logo besides it), then it can operate in that mode. Provided
            - The screen supports it (this one does)
            - The negotiation between the computer and screen succeeds (the kernel should be able to handle this for most controllers, now, AFAIK). Sometimes, the controller's firmware does it automatically (especially Intel controllers, I think).

            Otherwise, you'll fallback in a slower displaylink (sort of a USB-connected GPU). I was under the impression that Displaylink devices would work out of the box. Do you still require proprietary drivers?

            I'm writing this on a (dell) DP-enabled USB-C docking station with two screens connected to it.

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