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Select HP Systems Can Now Update Their Firmware From Linux With Fwupd+LVFS

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  • Select HP Systems Can Now Update Their Firmware From Linux With Fwupd+LVFS

    Phoronix: Select HP Systems Can Now Update Their Firmware From Linux With Fwupd+LVFS

    After hinting another major OEM was to join the LVFS, Richard Hughes of Red Hat announced today that HP is the latest company backing the Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) for distributing system firmware updates via this platform that is then applied on systems via Fwupd and conveniently exposed through the likes of GNOME Software...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...FS-Fwupd-Party

  • #2
    I’m hoping this means laptops will soon be supportted.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm cheap so I buy old workstations to use as desktops. Being able to add HP Z series workstations to the list of good, supported Linux workstations is nice.

      I'd like a HP Z440/Z640 to eventually replace my current Dell T5500. What sucks about that generation is having to pick between single slot CPU and high GHz or multi-slot CPU and more threads...unlike the previous generation where the multi-slot CPUs were also the fastest. Westmere was a nice gen in that regard.

      I really wish AMD had a good Registered ECC ram option that wasn't Threadripper or Epyc...especially in an APU form because I don't necessarily need assloads of cores for a file server or an HTPC/emulation station (the embedded V1000 does take registered ECC ram but try to find one for sale). I'd really like the Sapphire fs-fp5v, but I cannot find price listed anywhere.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
        I really wish AMD had a good Registered ECC ram option that wasn't Threadripper or Epyc
        Their latest Opteron CPUs aren't bad. Asus makes the best or most easily available boards for them. KGPE-16 and kcma-d8

        I really wish AMD had a good Registered ECC ram option that wasn't Threadripper or Epyc...especially in an APU form
        That's kind of a tall order as the whole point of Reg ECC is being able to install hundreds of GB of RAM.

        Afaik it makes 0 sense to have that in an APU.

        It's already a stretch that Asrock managed to make a microATX Threadripper board, none else expected to sell smaller boards for Threadripper.

        I'd really like the Sapphire fs-fp5v, but I cannot find price listed anywhere.
        Someone asked them and they gave him the price list https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comment...e_fp5v_boards/

        And afaik the method of buying is contacting Sapphire directly and asking them, since this appears to be a low-ish volume or made to order product (so they build a batch when they have accumulated enough orders).

        There is also another mini itx ryzen embedded board that imho has better features (pcie, more sata, more usb ) https://www.ibase-europe.com/english...omputing/MI988 which can be found on Mouser distributor https://www.mouser.it/Search/Refine?Keyword=MI988 Do note that the price listed is excluding VAT so unless you are a businness you need to add 20% to the actual price.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          Their latest Opteron CPUs aren't bad. Asus makes the best or most easily available boards for them. KGPE-16 and kcma-d8

          That's kind of a tall order as the whole point of Reg ECC is being able to install hundreds of GB of RAM.

          Afaik it makes 0 sense to have that in an APU.
          It does when all one wants is a ZFS file server for their house and they want that to double up as an HTPC, retro emulation, Steam Link, or as a streaming media box to the rest of the house. ZFS just assumes that the memory is correct so Registered ECC works the best. Some Ryzen boards support unregistered ECC, but it's a crap shoot since it's up to the MB manufacturer to implement it or not. Ryzen Embedded is the only guaranteed Registered ECC solution from AMD that isn't Opteron, Threadripper, or Epyc and it's the only APU solution with Registered ECC AFAIK.

          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          It's already a stretch that Asrock managed to make a microATX Threadripper board, none else expected to sell smaller boards for Threadripper.
          While that's nice, Threadripper is more power than necessary for the usage I'm wanting...but see below as to why it's a better solution than embedded...

          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          Someone asked them and they gave him the price list https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comment...e_fp5v_boards/

          And afaik the method of buying is contacting Sapphire directly and asking them, since this appears to be a low-ish volume or made to order product (so they build a batch when they have accumulated enough orders).
          I saw that. It just sucks when Reddit screenshots are the best info one can get outside of inquiring directly.

          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          There is also another mini itx ryzen embedded board that imho has better features (pcie, more sata, more usb ) https://www.ibase-europe.com/english...omputing/MI988 which can be found on Mouser distributor https://www.mouser.it/Search/Refine?Keyword=MI988 Do note that the price listed is excluding VAT so unless you are a businness you need to add 20% to the actual price.
          The Sapphire board is just on the edge of reasonably priced for what it is. Those other ones are too damn much for what they are, IMHO.

          I could build a nice PC with the $742+accessories I'd have to spend on one of those -- Cheapest Threadripper + Cheapest RX 560 GPU + Cheapest MB would run circles around one of those embedded boards and we're at about the same price, same features, much better hardware, and we still need the same parts to finish either one off.

          IMHO, that means that Threadripper is either priced too low or their embedded boards are priced too high.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
            It does when all one wants is a ZFS file server for their house and they want that to double up as an HTPC, retro emulation, Steam Link, or as a streaming media box to the rest of the house.
            No it does not. You don't need more than 64GB of ECC RAM to run a home server, even with ZFS.
            I hardly see how you could need more than 32GB with your needs, which is the max you can install in a mini itx board (only 2 RAM sockets).

            ZFS just assumes that the memory is correct so Registered ECC works the best. Some Ryzen boards support unregistered ECC, but it's a crap shoot since it's up to the MB manufacturer to implement it or not. Ryzen Embedded is the only guaranteed Registered ECC solution from AMD that isn't Opteron, Threadripper, or Epyc and it's the only APU solution with Registered ECC AFAIK.
            Ryzen embedded only supports unbuffered ECC.

            "registered ECC" just means that the RAM bank has a signal repeater/multiplexer IC (the "register" or "buffer") so it can fit more RAM chips on the same DIMM. The whole point of this is to allow them to cram more RAM in the same DIMM size than it would be possible in an unbuffered system, where each RAM chip is connected directly to the ram controller on the CPU/board. Which is why you can't install reg ECC RAM on a system not supporting it, the RAM controller has to be able to communicate with the "register" of each DIMM, as it is not a transparent component.

            The limit of unbuffered ECC was 32GB (4 slots, 8GB per DIMM) with DDR3, and now with DDr4 is 64GB (4 slots, 16GB per DIMM), registered ECC can go up as high as 64GB per DIMM I think, and should be able to go up to 128GB per DIMM eventually.
            I mean ok that's a significant RAM increase, but I still fail to see why a home user would even want that much ram.

            Maybe you are confusing "registered" with "officially supporting unbuffered ECC", as that's what Ryzen embedded do. Their ECC support was actually validated by AMD, while desktop Ryzens aren't.

            Theoretically also Ryzen desktop PRO APUs should be validated for ECC, but the only source for them is some Dell or HP workstations that are not really cheap nor support ECC themselves (so you would end up spending 600-800$ for just a processor)

            IMHO, that means that Threadripper is either priced too low or their embedded boards are priced too high.
            Neither, embedded boards aren't as heavily mass-produced as threadripper CPUs (alone) or motherboards (alone) or GPUs you can install anywhere. As simple as that.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              No it does not. You don't need more than 64GB of ECC RAM to run a home server, even with ZFS.
              I hardly see how you could need more than 32GB with your needs, which is the max you can install in a mini itx board (only 2 RAM sockets).
              64GB+ is what I'd aim for. I'm using 48GB right now and sometimes it has its limitations. Not ZFS limitations, but other crap like ram disks for games, compiling stuff when multitasking, etc. Skyrim + mods + normal ram use from playing it is really tight with 48GB. I also like ripping disks and doing transcodes entirely in ram.

              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              Ryzen embedded only supports unbuffered ECC.

              "registered ECC" just means that the RAM bank has a signal repeater/multiplexer IC (the "register" or "buffer") so it can fit more RAM chips on the same DIMM. The whole point of this is to allow them to cram more RAM in the same DIMM size than it would be possible in an unbuffered system, where each RAM chip is connected directly to the ram controller on the CPU/board. Which is why you can't install reg ECC RAM on a system not supporting it, the RAM controller has to be able to communicate with the "register" of each DIMM, as it is not a transparent component.

              The limit of unbuffered ECC was 32GB (4 slots, 8GB per DIMM) with DDR3, and now with DDr4 is 64GB (4 slots, 16GB per DIMM), registered ECC can go up as high as 64GB per DIMM I think, and should be able to go up to 128GB per DIMM eventually.
              I mean ok that's a significant RAM increase, but I still fail to see why a home user would even want that much ram.

              Maybe you are confusing "registered" with "officially supporting unbuffered ECC", as that's what Ryzen embedded do. Their ECC support was actually validated by AMD, while desktop Ryzens aren't.

              Theoretically also Ryzen desktop PRO APUs should be validated for ECC, but the only source for them is some Dell or HP workstations that are not really cheap nor support ECC themselves (so you would end up spending 600-800$ for just a processor)
              No, I meant registered as it means. Trust me, I get that most people don't use assloads of ram like I do. I used to be one of those "why use a ton of ram" people until I bought 48GBs for $60...6 8GB sticks, triple channel ram (gotta love eBay liquidations). I'm using registered ECC in my current PC in case I come across some 16GB sticks for real cheap. I just like the option to have it and the extra ram registered can bring is an added benefit when thinking about future upgrades/what to do when I get something new and repurpose this system (plus it's usually dirt cheap used when companies upgrade their workstations and servers).

              As for the Ryzens, it's a crapshoot. The CPUs unofficially support ECC ram but it's up to the MB if it'll work or not. Unbuffered ECC works with Ryzen on a few different Asrock and Asus boards. There are a few Reddit threads about it and one of those MB manufacturers even says unbuffered ECC works with certain MB models. I don't remember which since I was a little 420'd when reading it...Asrock I think... AFAIK, no one has even unofficially got ECC to work with any Ryzen APU outside of the Pro models...and I saw your post on the matter doing a GIS earlier. I more than likely am confusing the Ryzen embedded ECC stuff all around.

              The Pro APU stuff....hopefully they'll be more available for consumers and DIY builds in the future. Those buggers look perfect for a lot of applications and geek projects.

              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              Neither, embedded boards aren't as heavily mass-produced as threadripper CPUs (alone) or motherboards (alone) or GPUs you can install anywhere. As simple as that.
              I get that, but it's still similar to a $250 APU and a $75 motherboard. It's hard to justify $450 and up for that regardless of how mass produced it is.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                ....registered ECC can go up as high as 64GB per DIMM I think, and should be able to go up to 128GB per DIMM eventually.
                Actually, if your board supports octa-rank LRDIMMs (which most workstation and server boards do) you can already use 128GB RAM RCC/Registered LRDIMMs on most Xeon SP and AMD Epyc MBs.

                Per subject at hand, given the relatively high chance of a single bit error, as the amount of memory increases (Between 1bit per GB per year and 1bit per GB per day), I wouldn't even consider using non-ECC memory on machine with 16GB or above. Especially if it meant to stay up for months at a time.

                - Gilboa

                DEV: Intel S2600C0, 2xE52658V2, 32GB, 4x2TB + 2x3TB, GTX1080, F28/x86_64, Dell UP3216Q 4K.
                SRV: Intel S5520SC, 2xX5680, 36GB, 4x2TB, GTX550, F28/x86_64, Dell U2711..
                BAK: Tyan Tempest i5400XT, 2xE5335, 8GB, 3x1.5TB, 9800GTX, F28/x86-64.
                LAP: ASUS Strix GL502V, i7-6700HQ, 32GB, 1TB+256GB, 1070M, F29/x86_64.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                  64GB+ is what I'd aim for. I'm using 48GB right now and sometimes it has its limitations. Not ZFS limitations, but other crap like ram disks for games, compiling stuff when multitasking, etc. Skyrim + mods + normal ram use from playing it is really tight with 48GB. I also like ripping disks and doing transcodes entirely in ram.



                  No, I meant registered as it means. Trust me, I get that most people don't use assloads of ram like I do. I used to be one of those "why use a ton of ram" people until I bought 48GBs for $60...6 8GB sticks, triple channel ram (gotta love eBay liquidations). I'm using registered ECC in my current PC in case I come across some 16GB sticks for real cheap. I just like the option to have it and the extra ram registered can bring is an added benefit when thinking about future upgrades/what to do when I get something new and repurpose this system (plus it's usually dirt cheap used when companies upgrade their workstations and servers).

                  As for the Ryzens, it's a crapshoot. The CPUs unofficially support ECC ram but it's up to the MB if it'll work or not. Unbuffered ECC works with Ryzen on a few different Asrock and Asus boards. There are a few Reddit threads about it and one of those MB manufacturers even says unbuffered ECC works with certain MB models. I don't remember which since I was a little 420'd when reading it...Asrock I think... AFAIK, no one has even unofficially got ECC to work with any Ryzen APU outside of the Pro models...and I saw your post on the matter doing a GIS earlier. I more than likely am confusing the Ryzen embedded ECC stuff all around.

                  The Pro APU stuff....hopefully they'll be more available for consumers and DIY builds in the future. Those buggers look perfect for a lot of applications and geek projects.



                  I get that, but it's still similar to a $250 APU and a $75 motherboard. It's hard to justify $450 and up for that regardless of how mass produced it is.
                  Have you considered buying two used Xeons (or AMD Opterons) and a used board?
                  My oldest dual X5680 workstation is ~8 (!) years old and I doubt that I ever seen it crash (knock wood!!!)

                  - Gilboa
                  DEV: Intel S2600C0, 2xE52658V2, 32GB, 4x2TB + 2x3TB, GTX1080, F28/x86_64, Dell UP3216Q 4K.
                  SRV: Intel S5520SC, 2xX5680, 36GB, 4x2TB, GTX550, F28/x86_64, Dell U2711..
                  BAK: Tyan Tempest i5400XT, 2xE5335, 8GB, 3x1.5TB, 9800GTX, F28/x86-64.
                  LAP: ASUS Strix GL502V, i7-6700HQ, 32GB, 1TB+256GB, 1070M, F29/x86_64.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                    64GB+ is what I'd aim for. I'm using 48GB right now and sometimes it has its limitations. Not ZFS limitations, but other crap like ram disks for games, compiling stuff when multitasking, etc. Skyrim + mods + normal ram use from playing it is really tight with 48GB. I also like ripping disks and doing transcodes entirely in ram.
                    Wow, so you actually found ways to use so much ram on your own. That's fair I guess but it's kind of niche.

                    As for the Ryzens, it's a crapshoot.
                    Now (years later) it's pretty well-known what boards actually support ECC and what don't, and it's actually a pretty decent situation where the manufacturer specs can be trusted, which is a nice thing.

                    The only brand that lied on ECC support on some boards is Gigabyte, which is on my black list for other reasons already, so all is fine.

                    few Reddit threads about it and one of those MB manufacturers even says unbuffered ECC works with certain MB models.
                    I assume you mean registered here and no it is NOT possible at all as AM4 socket CPUs don't support that, the MB can't add support on its own.
                    Registered ECC is on Threadripper and Epyc only as that's where they expect people to actually need large amounts of RAM.

                    AFAIK, no one has even unofficially got ECC to work with any Ryzen APU outside of the Pro models...and I saw your post on the matter doing a GIS earlier. I more than likely am confusing the Ryzen embedded ECC stuff all around.
                    Yes, Asrock and ASUS now state this also in their motherboard specs, ECC support for APUs is only on PRO versions.
                    The Pro APU stuff....hopefully they'll be more available for consumers and DIY builds in the future. Those buggers look perfect for a lot of applications and geek projects.
                    That's unlikely, PRO APUs are sold only to OEMs, which I doubt will try to resell them separately.

                    I get that, but it's still similar to a $250 APU and a $75 motherboard. It's hard to justify $450 and up for that regardless of how mass produced it is.
                    Yeah, but your original statement was that the board was not priced properly. Which is wrong, as I said.

                    Comment

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