Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ Launches At $25+

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ Launches At $25+

    Phoronix: Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ Launches At $25+

    While the next Raspberry Pi will be a major redesign, the Raspberry Pi Foundation today released the Compute Module 3+ as their newest module intended for embedded/industrial applications...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ry-Pi-New-CM-3

  • #2
    What's the difference between this and the Raspberry Pi Zero?
    ## VGA ##
    AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
    Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
      What's the difference between this and the Raspberry Pi Zero?
      This requires a daughterboard to do anything as it has no ports nor anything else, the Zero is self-sufficient.

      Afaik this has a ton more GPIO or stuff too, but it's not something major imho.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've seen a lot of these kinds of modules over the years but I've never really looked into them. Is there an industry standard for them or the daughterboards? If there isn't, I don't really understand the point of making this thing, because the Pi Zero is smaller and easier for hobbyists (who want to do their own soldering) to work with.

        Comment


        • #5
          I was really hoping a refresh of the zero was coming out soon. Any hope for feb or march?

          Comment


          • #6
            I was hoping for news on the redesigned PI! Kinda hoping for orders of magnitude more performance and more I/O! More I/O would include digital discrete of course but also one or more dedicated serial I/O ports.

            Ideally those serial I/O ports would be set up to take small vertically mounted I/O boards thus avoiding board stacking. We are not talking large boards here, maybe 1. 5 to 2 square inches in size. The real challenge is deciding on the best serial port for those boards. USB is modern but frankly unreliable and not exactly programmer /hardware dears hacker friendly. There are however a number of chip interconnect ports out there that could be easier to implement. I’d even would like PCI express considered. The end goal here is easily plugged in single function boards (A to D, D to A, RE232 / 485, discrete I/O extenders and the like) that don’t crowd board space by a vertical relation to thee main board.

            By by the way that doesn’t mean baring legacy board support. It does mean a bigger board though. Further we don’t need a lot of space here thus boards of a couple of square inches.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by wizard69 View Post
              I was hoping for news on the redesigned PI! Kinda hoping for orders of magnitude more performance and more I/O! More I/O would include digital discrete of course but also one or more dedicated serial I/O ports.
              I don't think we're ever going to see such a thing. The original Pi design has kinda become an industry standard for embedded devices. There are many competing boards that share the exact same design and layout, deliberately.
              However, it would be nice if there were more ARM boards that would comply with the nano ITX and pico ITX form factors.

              Comment


              • #8
                With the introduction--for several years now--of SBCs with 2GHz 4-8 core processors, 2 GB of RAM, 64GB of eMMC...the Raspberry Pi has become irrelevant. The only thing they do to "keep the dream alive" is to keep coming out with useless "innovations", such as the disaster known as "POE", which could have been designed by a 10-year-old. Since the CM has eMMC, why have they not designed this into the original RPi, to replace the highly-corruptible (since the Very First Unit, and NEVER fixed) mass-data-storage SD card? This, in itself, is one of the biggest jokes about the RPi, and should be a major source of embarrassment. And don't talk to me about "price point". If the RPi group INSISTS on keeping their vaunted "$35 price point" in the face of the current competition, they are history.

                The Raspberry Pi Group needs to stick to what it has become best at now: publishing magazines.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by danmcgrew View Post
                  With the introduction--for several years now--of SBCs with 2GHz 4-8 core processors, 2 GB of RAM, 64GB of eMMC...the Raspberry Pi has become irrelevant. The only thing they do to "keep the dream alive" is to keep coming out with useless "innovations", such as the disaster known as "POE", which could have been designed by a 10-year-old. Since the CM has eMMC, why have they not designed this into the original RPi, to replace the highly-corruptible (since the Very First Unit, and NEVER fixed) mass-data-storage SD card? This, in itself, is one of the biggest jokes about the RPi, and should be a major source of embarrassment. And don't talk to me about "price point". If the RPi group INSISTS on keeping their vaunted "$35 price point" in the face of the current competition, they are history.

                  The Raspberry Pi Group needs to stick to what it has become best at now: publishing magazines.
                  Given the fact that this non-profit *charity* (!) organization, an organization that was founded with a express purpose of building and spreading a couple of 1000's of cheap computing devices to school kids around the globe, manage to sell >20 million devices in 7 years and more-or-less became the de-facto standard for their class (a class that they more-or-less invented), I would imagine that your disapproval for their hardware design and pricing will not keep them awake at night.

                  That said, given the fact that you are so keen to relegate the R-PI organization to publishing magazines, care to share your success story? Given your tone, I would assume that you've done far better, right?
                  Last edited by gilboa; 01-28-2019, 12:40 PM.
                  DEV: Intel S2600C0, 2xE52658V2, 32GB, 4x2TB + 2x3TB, GTX1080, F28/x86_64, Dell UP3216Q 4K.
                  SRV: Intel S5520SC, 2xX5680, 36GB, 4x2TB, GTX550, F28/x86_64, Dell U2711..
                  BAK: Tyan Tempest i5400XT, 2xE5335, 8GB, 3x1.5TB, 9800GTX, F28/x86-64.
                  LAP: ASUS Strix GL502V, i7-6700HQ, 32GB, 1TB+256GB, 1070M, F29/x86_64.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by danmcgrew View Post
                    With the introduction--for several years now--of SBCs with 2GHz 4-8 core processors, 2 GB of RAM, 64GB of eMMC...the Raspberry Pi has become irrelevant. The only thing they do to "keep the dream alive" is to keep coming out with useless "innovations", such as the disaster known as "POE", which could have been designed by a 10-year-old. Since the CM has eMMC, why have they not designed this into the original RPi, to replace the highly-corruptible (since the Very First Unit, and NEVER fixed) mass-data-storage SD card? This, in itself, is one of the biggest jokes about the RPi, and should be a major source of embarrassment. And don't talk to me about "price point". If the RPi group INSISTS on keeping their vaunted "$35 price point" in the face of the current competition, they are history.

                    The Raspberry Pi Group needs to stick to what it has become best at now: publishing magazines.
                    They just joined RISC-V foundation so maybe they're moving into that direction? I agree the RPi3B is now pretty outdated.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X