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What Do You Want To See Out Of The Redesigned, Next-Gen Raspberry Pi?

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  • #81
    Originally posted by Terrablit View Post
    3. Rethink PSU. Needs power switch, shutdown via OS, higher amperage or additional power supply for peripherals
    It needs a lot more than that. If you want SATA, you'll probably also want 12V DC. The 5V USB via micro USB is a joke. AFAIK many SBCs can't even run 5V 2,5" small form factor drives because the 5V supply isn't strong enough (e.g. usb cable wires are too thin).
    Originally posted by Terrablit View Post
    5. Fix thermal issues
    Wouldn't a heatsink work for you?

    Originally posted by Terrablit View Post
    6. USB 3
    7. DDR4
    8. GPU that supports Vulkan
    What's your planned use case? As a gaming console?
    Last edited by caligula; 11-19-2018, 09:35 PM.

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    • #82
      Expansion slot for 4 or 8 GB of RAM.

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      • #83
        Originally posted by sykobee View Post
        The main thing for the next generation RPi will be continued community support, via continued software support for the major platforms that run on the hardware.

        Also the guys do work closely with Broadcom, I imagine that they will continue to do so. So it boils down to whatever Broadcom can offer, SoC-wise, for under $10 per SoC (I feel they can go to $40 for the next board - that's in line inflation-wise with the original hardware). That looks likely to still be a quad-A53, a 1.6-1.8GHz 28nm SoC similar to the existing Videocore V SoC - which does include integrated GigE - e.g., https://www.broadcom.com/products/br...op-box/bcm7251 (although BCM7268 or BCM7278 are the quad-core variants of this silicon) and PCIe (for the desired M2 slot).

        I am assuming that there will be a saving on USB-Ethernet bridge (it should be fully integrated), and hopefully the USB hub as well.

        Ideally:

        1) USB C port replacing Micro-USB port (power and USB data)
        2) 2x USB 3 Type A
        3) 2x USB 2 Type A
        4) GigE port
        5) DDR3/4 memory (2 GB would be desirable)

        Maybe there will be enough space on the board for an optional eSSD of some sort to be installed once the other support chips are eradicated.
        4 or 8 GB is more desirable. An expansion slot for this amount of RAM would suffice. This is much more important than CPU/memory speed IMO.

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        • #84
          Originally posted by jpg44 View Post

          4 or 8 GB is more desirable. An expansion slot for this amount of RAM would suffice. This is much more important than CPU/memory speed IMO.
          8GB is too much. 4GB top. We are not talking about video editing, ray tracing, 3d creator, many-tabbed-internet-browsing-with-chrome-or-the-like-browser, or android programming computer. It's x64 portion.

          Use x64 if you want 8GB. You can do sooo much more with x64 architecture.

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          • #85
            New Rpi needs at least 16 x86-64 cores, in order to be useful. Also, 32 GB of RAM, some SAS interfaces, PCIe 4.0 slots, and a decent DX12 GPU. And some thunderbolt ports. And if it's more than $35, it's overpriced.

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            • #86
              I'd want more internal headers (either usb, or just a simple pwr+gnd+data+clk/data) placed far away from the other headers to facilitate hooking small (and/or cheap) things up within the standard cases and without interfering with hats. (especially relevant in the Zero form factor - but for those ship the header unpopulated)

              Also an ADC (preferable one that comes with a microphone jack (so making the analouge audio connector a four-ring would suffice)) that preferably can at least sample voices. This in part to ease interaction with analouge sensors and in part to ease setup of voice-controlled systems.
              (I know, I2S, but equipment to hook up to that usually is quite exotic and hard to find compared to stuff you can just hook up to a plain old analouge microphone jack)

              I still see the boards as experimental platforms whose main purpose is to lower the barriers of entry for starting various projects.

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              • #87
                Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                New Rpi needs at least 16 x86-64 cores, in order to be useful. Also, 32 GB of RAM, some SAS interfaces, PCIe 4.0 slots, and a decent DX12 GPU. And some thunderbolt ports. And if it's more than $35, it's overpriced.
                Without 10Gb ethernet??? That would be terrible as fuck at this price point.

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                • #88
                  Years ago I read something about an AMD APU that would mix ARM, x86_64, and GPU cores. If we're going with wishes and dreams, I'd like that to power an SoC with at least 8GB of ram, preferably 16GB to play x86/Steam games with mods. Run it in ARM mode by default for desktop stuff & to help keep the power usage low and offload to x86 when the extra performance is needed.

                  A possible added benefit is console game makers are getting more and more used to AMD APU programming since that's what every console uses now and what the next generations will likely use so there's a good chance that something like this would pick up decent community support.

                  Obviously my use case is desktop stuff: streaming videos, gaming & emulation, emails, lots of browser tabs, some a/v transcoding. I'm aware I basically described a PS4-on-a-chip with ARM cores slapped on...like I said, wishes and dreams.

                  On a side note -- I wish AMD or Sony would port the PS4 GPU driver over to BSD since the PS4 OS is FreeBSD based. AMD's Linux driver and Steam are the only reasons I use Linux over BSD. I'd put up with Linux\Steam compatibility layers and Wine if BSD was a first party OS for AMD...Dealt with Linux+Wine for years so compatibility layers are nothing new...

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                  • #89
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
                    Years ago I read something about an AMD APU that would mix ARM, x86_64, and GPU cores. If we're going with wishes and dreams, I'd like that to power an SoC with at least 8GB of ram, preferably 16GB to play x86/Steam games with mods. Run it in ARM mode by default for desktop stuff & to help keep the power usage low and offload to x86 when the extra performance is needed.
                    Right. I'm sure the RPi Trading has such a huge budget for developing this kind of new hybrid x86/ARM nobody else is selling atm.

                    A possible added benefit is console game makers are getting more and more used to AMD APU programming since that's what every console uses now and what the next generations will likely use so there's a good chance that something like this would pick up decent community support.
                    I wonder what the benefits of providing all the GPIO pins and ARM is here. Modern x86 i3/atom is pretty power efficient. Is the idle power consumption really a problem? Which chipset has open drivers so you can actually run any software on that platform?

                    Obviously my use case is desktop stuff: streaming videos, gaming & emulation, emails, lots of browser tabs, some a/v transcoding. I'm aware I basically described a PS4-on-a-chip with ARM cores slapped on...like I said, wishes and dreams.
                    I think the 5x5 / NUC boards already cover this desktop use quite well. RPi is a hybrid microcontroller / PC with nice set of low level ports for embedded connectivity. I think there should be more ports. These NUC boards could also have some small pin controller though. At least few GPIO leds/pins and one I2C.

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                    • #90
                      Perhaps it doesn't need to change. Tbh if we want to build up a really solid platform for teaching kids to code (their original goal) then keeping a single version stagnant for 20 years would be a fantastic way of building up a great repo of documentation and a solid base to learn from.

                      Having fragmented docs where some of it is for Pi 1, some of it is for Pi 3 aarch and some armv6 all with different desktop environments and things just makes it another complex computer. Kids don't need a complex computer, they need a BBC acorn

                      For my personal uses, I would like to see a VGA port haha. I have loads of Pis, loads of Keyboards, loads of everything... *except* HDMI monitors! With a VGA out, I can finally repurpose my remaining old sh*t XD
                      Last edited by kpedersen; 11-20-2018, 08:35 AM.

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