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USB Type-C Improvements On The Way To The Linux 4.17 Kernel

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  • #11
    Originally posted by edwaleni View Post

    "Massive?". I am familiar with alt-modes. and muxing onto the Type C port. That is why I said less than "full" specification.

    Why show a Type C is only under Gen1 or 2 when the USB spec says otherwise? Hence the graphic above.

    The point beyond my original Linux support request is that while the standards are published, in the market is confusion.
    People basically just need to know that USB Type-C is compatible with older USB but better in every way.

    Most people simply know USB Type-C as "the new universal charger port" (which it is).

    More advanced users will have to learn that there are differences between cables, in charging speed an.d data transfer speed, and that devices can use different protocols over USB such as displayport.

    Agree that there may be some indicator for these characteristics on Type-C cables and ports. But that might add even more confusion for users.

    Every Type-C cable should be required to be able to transfer at least 5Gbps, which some devices now require.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by wagaf View Post
      People basically just need to know that USB Type-C is compatible with older USB but better in every way.
      The confusion is that not every port delivers or accepts everything. And it's not visible.

      Eg. A laptop has five Type-C ports.
      1. Can only do charging.
      2. Does USB 1.x/2.x in host mode.
      3. Does USB 1.x/2.x/3.x host + Altmodes: HDMI/DP out and HDMI in not TB or Ethernet.
      4. Does USB 1.x/2.x/3.x host and guest + Altmodes: TB or Ethernet not HDMI/DP.
      5. Does Analog audio.
      Now how can we tell the user that in a way that's obvious and consistent across vendors?

      Don't get me wrong I'm all for Type-C. On port, one cable to rule them all. But advertising port capabilities is something that needs work

      Oh and let's have a wall outlet with Type-C which provides Power and USB hooked providing Ethernet and Audio out guest Devices.

      Happy plugging.
      Falcon1
      Junior Member
      Last edited by Falcon1; 05 April 2018, 04:39 AM.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Falcon1 View Post
        The confusion is that not every port delivers or accepts everything. And it's not visible.

        Eg. A laptop has five Type-C ports.
        1. Can only do charging.
        2. Does USB 1.x/2.x in host mode.
        3. Does USB 1.x/2.x/3.x host + Altmodes: HDMI/DP out and HDMI in not TB or Ethernet.
        4. Does USB 1.x/2.x/3.x host and guest + Altmodes: TB or Ethernet not HDMI/DP.
        5. Does Analog audio.
        at least the TB ones (and to my knowledge the most commonly used ones in notebooks) are marked with a ... thunderbolt.

        looking at my notebook, i do have 2 TB type C marked with the aforementioned thunderbolt and a standard type A with a "SS*high voltage sign*" - indicating usb 3.0 with additonal charging support.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Falcon1 View Post
          The confusion is that not every port delivers or accepts everything. And it's not visible.

          Eg. A laptop has five Type-C ports.
          1. Can only do charging.
          2. Does USB 1.x/2.x in host mode.
          3. Does USB 1.x/2.x/3.x host + Altmodes: HDMI/DP out and HDMI in not TB or Ethernet.
          4. Does USB 1.x/2.x/3.x host and guest + Altmodes: TB or Ethernet not HDMI/DP.
          5. Does Analog audio.
          Now how can we tell the user that in a way that's obvious and consistent across vendors?

          Don't get me wrong I'm all for Type-C. On port, one cable to rule them all. But advertising port capabilities is something that needs work

          Oh and let's have a wall outlet with Type-C which provides Power and USB hooked providing Ethernet and Audio out guest Devices.

          Happy plugging.
          You mean like this...?

          https://www.alogic.co/pub/media/wysi...Full_chart.png

          To the best of my knowledge, Apple is the only one who doesn't. (On laptops)

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          • #15
            Asmedia ASM3142 supports USB3.1 Gen 2.

            Supported in all mainstream Linux kernels (per Asmedia)

            No publicly available silicon for USB 3.2 yet.

            Asmedia ASM2142 had some limitations due to the number PCIe lanes and the PCIe v2 spec. ASM3142 uses PCIe v3 spec.

            ASM3142 supports (2) full 10Gbps ports, whereas ASM2142 had to split 3.1 lane bandwidth.

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            • #16
              Thanks for your comment
              edwaleni
              Senior Member
              edwaleni !
              I understand it is a very old comment, but as a simple user, what should I expect if I plug a daugther board into a PCIe connector. Will it work under an Ubuntu based OS?
              Thank you for bringing clarity to this.
              Best

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