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Intel SSD 760p 256GB NVMe SSD For $99 USD On Linux

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  • Intel SSD 760p 256GB NVMe SSD For $99 USD On Linux

    Phoronix: Intel SSD 760p 256GB NVMe SSD For $99 USD On Linux

    If the extremely fast Intel Optane SSD 900p is out of your budget with its 3D XPoint memory, this week Intel rolled out the SSD 760p series with 64-layer TLC 3D NAND memory. For less than $100 USD you can get the 256GB capacity Intel 760p SSD, which is what we are benchmarking today under Ubuntu Linux.

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=25955

  • #2
    Im waiting on a 2TB version... I hope its not too long

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    • #3
      Michael some times you do second class reviews. I believe that if you ask all Phoronix readers, a 90% will want a SSD privacy based review. For example: if i remove a file the simple way, for how long the SSD will keep my data and what is the potential for removed data to be recovered. I mean an SSD that can write 300MBps but the removed data are destroyed within month is a thousand times better than one that can write 500MBps but destroys removed data in a year or never. You should refer to technologies like that in your next article.

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      • #4
        The best workaround for losing SSD speed because of Meltdown: Give more money to Intel!

        A pity you can't pirate hardware.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by artivision View Post
          Michael some times you do second class reviews. I believe that if you ask all Phoronix readers, a 90% will want a SSD privacy based review. For example: if i remove a file the simple way, for how long the SSD will keep my data and what is the potential for removed data to be recovered. I mean an SSD that can write 300MBps but the removed data are destroyed within month is a thousand times better than one that can write 500MBps but destroys removed data in a year or never. You should refer to technologies like that in your next article.
          How do you test that?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by artivision View Post
            Michael some times you do second class reviews.
            Fair enough, therefore, you have an example "first class review", and in particular covering the topic you mentioned. Feel free to put up a link. Alternatively of course, offer to do this review yourself (which we all know will be "first class").

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by artivision View Post
              Michael some times you do second class reviews. I believe that if you ask all Phoronix readers, a 90% will want a SSD privacy based review. For example: if i remove a file the simple way, for how long the SSD will keep my data and what is the potential for removed data to be recovered. I mean an SSD that can write 300MBps but the removed data are destroyed within month is a thousand times better than one that can write 500MBps but destroys removed data in a year or never. You should refer to technologies like that in your next article.
              Not sure if troll, but this is the most retarded comment I've seen this week.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by tpruzina View Post

                Not sure if troll, but this is the most retarded comment I've seen this week.
                No troll, no disrespect for Michael either. I meant that usually Michael is a lot better to this job than the standard, but some times he forgets. And yes some times things i say may seam unbelievable but the tech goes as i wrote above.

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                • #9
                  I'm planning to build an OpenStack home server consisting of several different nodes in the near future: the first node as a router/controller, the second node for storage with file/media server and containers, and a third node consisting as a storage node for storing surveillance footage. I know this sounds overkill, but I want to get a feel for what OpenStack is all about. The three nodes are going to have NVME and I care about performance-per-dollar. I don't need more than 128GB for primary storage of OpenStack nodes, so my question is, which NVME M.2 SSD would you recommend? I like to keep the temperature as low as possible, so I'm not seeking raw read/write performance.

                  And sure, I could just stick with just ordinary Ubuntu Server, but I would like to open myself up for a challenge and make use of OpenStack in my home environment, so no "OpenStack is overkill" comments.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ElectricPrism View Post
                    Im waiting on a 2TB version... I hope its not too long
                    make raid of smaller ones, it will be faster

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