1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

GCC 4.8 To Improve Diagnostics Abilities

Compiler

Published on 11 July 2012 09:32 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Compiler
3 Comments

In a battle against LLVM/Clang, GCC 4.8 will improve the code diagnostics support to better assist developers in debugging code errors/warnings in a user-friendly manner.

One of the long-advertised features of LLVM's Clang C/Objective-C/C++ compiler has been that it offers more user-friendly diagnostics than the GNU Compiler Collection. Historically this has been true, especially against GCC 4.2 -- the last GPLv2 compiler release. However, GCC developers have been working to improve this situation. With GCC 4.8, it looks like more of this work will come to fruition.

On the LLVM web-site there's long been the Clang Expressive Diagnostics page to show off that Clang's error reporting/diagnostics are superior to GCC. "In addition to being fast and functional, we aim to make Clang extremely user friendly. As far as a command-line compiler goes, this basically boils down to making the diagnostics (error and warning messages) generated by the compiler be as useful as possible. There are several ways that we do this. This section talks about the experience provided by the command line compiler, contrasting Clang output to GCC 4.2's output in several examples."

Now on the GCC side they have been working on a Clang Diagnostics Comparison Wiki page. This comparison page was brought up yesterday at DebConf Managua when talking about building Debian packages with LLVM/Clang, but those details will be saved for another Phoronix article.

The GCC Clang Diagnostics Comparison is now about showing off where the latest GCC code is ahead of Clang. "It is often repeated that the Clang compiler produces far superior diagnostics to GCC. For example the Expressive Diagnostics page shows examples where Clang's diagnostics were indeed superior to GCC 4.2. However, that version of GCC is a few years old, and GCC has improved considerably since then. This page revisits the examples using recent versions of GCC and add further interesting examples."

Among the advertised features is GCC 4.8 introducing support for printed column numbers, caret diagnostics instead of pretty print expressions, typedef preservation, selective unwrapping, automatic macro expansion, quality of implementation and attention to detail, recursive template instantiations, and C++ template errors. There's also a Red Hat page promoting GCC diagnostics.

While the GCC improvements are nice, it will still be a number of months before GCC 4.8 is officially released. At that point, GCC 4.8 will be competing against LLVM/Clang 3.2 with LLVM/Clang 3.3 likely being mid-way in development.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Khronos Group Announces Vulkan, OpenCL 2.1, SPIR-V
  2. Samsung 850 EVO SSD Linux Benchmarks
  3. Kubuntu 15.04 Is Turning Out Quite Nice, Good Way To Try Out The Latest KDE
  4. 5-Way Linux Distribution Comparison On The Core i3 NUC
  5. OCZ ARC 100 Linux SSD Benchmarks
  6. Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Works Great As A Linux Ultrabook
Latest Linux News
  1. Mesa 10.5 Release Brings Skylake Support, NIR IR
  2. Intel Has More Graphics Driver Code Ready For Linux 4.1
  3. Fedora 22 Alpha Will Be Released Next Tuesday
  4. KDE Makes More Progress On HiDPI Support
  5. QuIC Continues Contributing To Open-Source MDP DRM/KMS Driver
  6. Reported Steam Linux Usage Battles To Stay Above 1.0%
  7. Benchmarks Of The $129 8-Core 64-bit ARM Development Board
  8. Wine 1.7.38 Supports Themed Scrollbars, Updated Mono Engine
  9. Siemens Commits New Motherboard Support To Coreboot
  10. Nuntius: Delivering Android Notifications To The GNOME Desktop
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Confirmed: Vulkan Is The Next-Gen Graphics API
  2. Xfce 4.12 Released After Nearly Three Years Of Work
  3. Valve Launches SteamOS Sale, Confirms A Lot Of New Linux Games
  4. 8cc: A Small C11 Compiler
  5. Unreal Engine Made Free By Epic Games
  6. Canonical's Latest Demo Of Ubuntu Unity 8 Convergence In Action
  7. Mozilla Thunderbird Adoption Climbs, Thunderbird 38 In May
  8. VLC 2.2 "Weathermax" Brings Better VP9 & H.265 Support