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New Plans For Linux Long-Term Kernel Releases

Linux Kernel

Published on 15 August 2011 03:30 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Linux Kernel
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Greg Kroah-Hartman has laid out his plans this morning for handling Linux kernel releases in the future that will be supported for the long-term. The proposal is quite simple and is not handled radically different from now with regards to kernel releases that are maintained for extended periods of time.

Greg's proposal is to basically to flag a "-longterm" kernel once per calendar year. That long-term kernel is then maintained for a period of two years before it is dropped. The "normal" kernel releases will continue with their same flow and development cycle, which is dropping new point releases before a new major release occurs. These non-longterm kernels will continue to be what's used by most desktop Linux distributions and others. The -longterm kernels is what's targeted by enterprise Linux distributions (i.e. SUSE and Red Hat Enterprise Linux) for their long-term support model. The -longterm kernels will still have the same rules as normal kernel releases, with not introducing new features outside of the original merge window.

More details on Greg's long-term Linux kernel plans can be found via his blog. Greg will also be at LinuxCon 2011 this week.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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