1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Moonlight Gets Generic GPU Video Acceleration

Free Software

Published on 23 March 2011 08:12 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Free Software
16 Comments

Miguel de Icaza, David Reveman, and their Novell team working on Mono/Moonlight began working on GPU acceleration support. This initial GPU acceleration support was largely focused on accelerating 3D transforms of objects -- just not videos, but all of the Silverlight content -- and other surfaces. They also landed a new rendering pipeline and other work. Pushed into Moonlight's Git repository today is more GPU acceleration work, but this time focusing upon optimizing Moonlight's engine for video rendering operations.

This video acceleration work in Moonlight, which makes Microsoft Silverlight content available under Linux and other non-Windows platforms, does not use VA-API, VDPAU, or any of the other Linux video acceleration APIs. It's a custon OpenGL shader-based solution.

Up to this point when handling video playback, Moonlight has converted H.264 video frames to YUV buffers, perform YUV to RGB conversions, scaled the frame (as an RGB bitmap) to the desired size, and then displayed the frame via transferring its contents through X. Thus it's very dependent upon the CPU and system memory.

With the just-committed GPU hardware accelerated video playback method, the H.264 video frame is still decoded to a YUV buffer by Moonlight, but then submitted directly to the graphics processor. There is then a custom OpenGL shader that's doing the pixel scaling/conversion. That transformed buffer is then composited using the new rendering pipeline already introduced in Moonlight 4.

Using this method, Moonlight is still doing the H.264 video decoding on the CPU, but the frames are being immediately offloaded to the GPU for the rest of the work. On the plus side, this should be quite portable with any OpenGL GPU/driver and does not depend upon any particular video API (VA-API, XvBA, X-Video, XvMC, VDPAU, etc) or Gallium3D state tracker.

For those not concerned with Microsoft Silverlight but the much more abundant Adobe Flash/SWF content, Gnash is carrying VA-API support, Lightspark is using an OpenGL engine (they've even debated having their own Gallium3D state tracker), and Adobe's official Flash Linux plug-in as of a few months back officially supports NVIDIA VDPAU and Broadcom's Crystal HD chipset. Intel VA-API support is forthcoming. Right now though for NVIDIA customers with the binary graphics driver, VDPAU with Flash works well.

This video acceleration work that was just pushed into their Git repository was mentioned on Miguel's blog.
Although native video playback solutions have been doing similar things for a while on Linux, we had to integrate this into the larger retained graphics system that is Moonlight. We might be late to the party, but it is now a hardware accelerated and smooth party.

And what does this looks like? It looks like heaven.

We were watching 1080p videos, running at full screen in David's office and it is absolutely perfect.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. OS X 10.10 vs. Ubuntu 15.04 vs. Fedora 21 Tests: Linux Sweeps The Board
  2. The New Place Where Linux Code Is Constantly Being Benchmarked
  3. 18-GPU NVIDIA/AMD Linux Comparison Of BioShock: Infinite
  4. Phoronix Test Suite 5.6 Adds New Phoromatic Enterprise Benchmarking Features
  5. OpenGL Threaded Optimizations Responsible For NVIDIA's Faster Performance?
  6. Big Graphics Card Comparison Of Metro Redux Games On Linux
Latest Linux News
  1. Git 2.4.0-rc0 Does A Ton Of Polishing
  2. The Most Common, Annoying Issue When Benchmarking Ubuntu On Many Systems
  3. Mesa Is At Nearly 1,500 Commits This Year
  4. Gestures & Other GTK3 Features For LibreOffice
  5. It's Now Easier To Try PHP 7 On Fedora & RHEL
  6. BQ Is Cleaning Up Their Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Kernel
  7. Allwinner Continues Jerking Around The Open-Source Community
  8. NVIDIA Linux 349.12 Beta Has Improved G-SYNC & VDPAU Features
  9. Canonical Just Made It Even Easier To Benchmark Ubuntu Linux In The Cloud
  10. NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X Linux Testing Time
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Introducing The Library Operating System For Linux
  2. AMD Is Hiring Two More Open-Source Linux GPU Driver Developers
  3. New SecureBoot Concerns Arise With Windows 10
  4. Allwinner Caught Obfuscating Their Improperly Licensed Code
  5. Latest OpenSSL Vulnerabilities Revealed; LibreSSL In Better Shape
  6. GNU Nano 2.4.0 Brings Complete Undo System, Linter Support & More
  7. GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.16.0 Released
  8. Microsoft Open-Sources MSBuild Engine
%%CLICK_URL_UNESC%%