1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking Benchmarking Platform
Phoromatic Test Orchestration

Unigine OilRush Pre-Order For Linux Now Open

Gaming

Published on 02 March 2011 10:46 AM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in Gaming
98 Comments

On Monday I reported that pre-ordering for Unigine's OilRush Linux game would be imminent. This morning, you can now pre-order this impressive game built atop the demanding but beautiful Unigine Engine.

OilRush is Unigine's first in-house game and we have been testing it since December while the February build is quite nice with the game being just weeks away from release.

By pre-ordering the game, Linux gamers are now able to get beta access to the game too. How much does the full version of this game cost? Just $20 USD! (Under 15 EUR) This is quite a bargain. Pre-ordering is available from Unigine's new web store. Payments are accepted via credit card, PayPal, Webmoney, or wire transfer.

Beyond getting beta access to the game, all funds go directly to Unigine Corp, "exclusive game-related materials" will be provided, etc.

While it's great to see OilRush pre-ordering is now available, Unigine Corp has decided to push back the official release date to June. This push back was done to allow the Russian developers more time on the complete the balanced and polished single player campaign. At least though there is now public beta access to pre-order customers.

Pre-order here. We can't wait to see the statistics from Unigine about sales of OilRush and the breakdown of Windows vs. Linux sales.

At the same time, Unigine Corp has also updated its Unigine Heaven benchmark to version 2.5. Version 2.5 of this demanding OpenGL / DirectX benchmark improves the GPU support, adds support for indirect occlusion, improved stability, improved the quality of ambient occlusion, and other fixes. For Windows users, Unigine has also released "Heaven Professional" at a cost of just under $500 USD. This version of the DirectX 11.0 benchmark adds command-line automation, CSV reporting, stress testing mode, technical support, and license for commercial use. However, if you use the Phoronix Test Suite on Linux and other platforms, you already have command line automation, reporting just not to CSV but XML, Text, and PDF, and result sharing on the just-launched OpenBenchmarking.org. The Phoronix Test Suite does this not only for Unigine Heaven, but also Unigine Sanctuary and Unigine Tropics.

Lastly, for those wondering about the recently talked about Flash support in the Unigine Engine, Denis Shergin (Unigine Corp CEO) has told Phoronix this morning that the engine has its own Flash implementation that is written completely from scratch without any dependence on external Flash/SWF libraries.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Sub-$20 802.11n USB WiFi Adapter That's Linux Friendly
  2. The Lenovo T450s Is Working Beautifully With Linux
  3. Linux 4.0 SSD EXT4 / Btrfs / XFS / F2FS Benchmarks
  4. Linux 4.0 Hard Drive Comparison With Six File-Systems
  5. Lenovo ThinkPad T450s Broadwell Preview
  6. How Open-Source Allowed Valve To Implement VULKAN Much Faster On The Source 2 Engine
Latest Linux News
  1. Red Hat Joins Khronos, The Group Behind OpenGL & Vulkan
  2. NetworkManager Drops WiMAX Support
  3. Wine 1.7.41 Works More On Kernel Job Objects, MSI Patches
  4. Linux 4.1 Has Improvements For The Multi-Queue Block Layer
  5. X.Org Looks To Have Six Summer Projects
  6. DragonFlyBSD Pulls In GCC 5 Compiler
  7. OpenBenchmarking.org Now Ad-Free, Load Times, New Servers & More
  8. Rust 1.0+ To Focus On Better Windows Support, ARM, & Faster Compile Times
  9. Ubuntu 15.04 Now Under Final Freeze
  10. Linux 4.1 Should Work With GCC 6, Future Versions Of GCC
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. Nouveau: NVIDIA's New Hardware Is "VERY Open-Source Unfriendly"
  2. Linux 4.0 Kernel Released
  3. Microsoft Announces An LLVM-Based Compiler For .NET
  4. Linux 4.1 Brings Many Potentially Risky x86/ASM Changes
  5. Encryption Support For EXT4
  6. VirtualBox 5.0 Beta 2 Released
  7. Mozilla Start Drafting Plans To Deprecate Insecure HTTP
  8. Elementary OS 0.3 "Freya" Now Available