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Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Just How Big Is OpenBenchmarking.org?

Phoronix

Published on 27 December 2010 11:34 PM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in Phoronix
3 Comments

With Iveland Alpha 5 arriving earlier today and more information beginning to be released about OpenBenchmarking.org for its February debut with Phoronix Test Suite 3.0, many have become more curious about what this project entails. Last week I posted a few very small screenshots of OpenBenchmarking.org in its current form. I also have already said OpenBenchmarking.org will become bigger than Phoronix itself, so here are a few statistics right now.

While these numbers are constantly rising and will be far higher by its February launch, here's a few database vitals for OpenBenchmarking.org as it stands this evening. This is information that's powered by the Phoronix Test Suite 3.0 "Iveland" development releases thus far, Phoronix Test Suite 2.0+ "Sandtorg" statistics, and combining some of Phoronix Global with other Phoronix Media assets to create one massive powerhouse.

In the OpenBenchmarking.org system is information on more than 209.749 test results carried out by the Phoronix Test Suite, more than 34,164 test result uploads, statistics on 63,814 systems, and data on 81,616 computer software/hardware components. There's also information extracted from 11,112 computer hardware reviews plus other information within this system. This is not even counting any information complemented by Phoronix.com itself or within our forums. There's also 126 tests and 47 suites in its package management system at the moment.

Just How Big Is OpenBenchmarking.org?


While these numbers are already large, by the official launch in February I suspect there will be results on more than 500,000 test completions, 90~100k+ component information, and the other metrics too will be much higher.

This information is all exposed very intuitively via OpenBenchmarking.org (of which LinuxBenchmarking.org is also a part) to suit your needs whether your an individual or organization looking for test results on hardware/software when looking for your next system upgrades, are interested in analyzing bottlenecks in your system, or even want to compare your system's performance to a similarly priced or similarly aged computer(s) against your own. It's all very easy to use and with virtually no manual intervention. OpenBenchmarking.org and the Phoronix Test Suite family of software makes this possible and a whole lot more. Even in its current pre-alpha form of OpenBenchmarking.org, practically every search query from pieces of computer hardware to software are already yielding promising results.

As said in last week's news, beginning in January videos will begin to come out that show off the yet-to-be-mentioned features of OpenBenchmarking.org and how to properly leverage this powerful system. In fact, the videos will show how to benchmark and find the best computer hardware/software in a meaningful and efficient manner while surfing the Banzai Pipeline.

Though it shouldn't come as a surprise that it's possible to run Linux benchmarks while on the world's deadliest wave, seeing as the Phoronix Test Suite's Phoromatic component can already be used for benchmarking from a lemon grove in Italy across the world, on a surfboard in the Pacific, or from the Augustiner tent at Oktoberfest.

Stay tuned for plenty more details on Phoronix Test Suite 3.0 "Iveland" and OpenBenchmarking.org as it will only continue to get more exciting.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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