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Who Contributed The Most During X Server 1.9?

X.Org

Published on 02 September 2010 10:23 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in X.Org
16 Comments

Two years ago we compiled a list of the top contributors to the X Server over the years and that was followed by compiling a similar list of the developers behind Mesa. Tiago Vignatti has now compiled some statistics surrounding the top contributors to X.Org Server 1.9 and related X components just looking at this most recent development cycle. There's also numbers for the input, video, and Mesa components too.

Below are various bits of information gathered from Tiago's statistics.

- Alan Coopersmith was the developer with the most change-sets to X, which Tiago counts as the X Server, proto, library, and XCB repositories. Alan accounted for 15.3% of these changes through his work at Oracle, after being a long-time X developer at Sun Microsystems. While Oracle may be doing nasty things to other open-source projects they hold stakes in and doing things like killing off OpenSolaris, they are at least so far letting Alan continue to contribute back to upstream X. The 2nd through 5th most active developers were Jamey Sharp, Gaetan Nadon, Keith Packard, and Tiago Vignatti, respectively.

- While Alan had the greatest number of change-sets to the X implementation, when it comes to the number of lines of code that were changed, his work fell into second place (at 23.4%) with Matt Dew accounting for more than 50% of the changed lines!

- Intel's Keith Packard had the most commit sign-offs and reviews during the 1.9 cycle, which should not come as a surprise considering he served as the X.Org Server 1.9 release manager.

- When it comes to X input with the xf86-input drivers, xkbcomp, and xkeyboard-config repositories, the developer with the most change-sets for 1.9 was Gaetan Nadon at 40.4% while Peter Hutterer who was the mastermind behind Multi-Pointer X (MPX) came in at second with 21.8% of the change-sets. Work from Sergey Udaltsov accounted though for 74.3% of the total changed lines of code for the X input side.

- When looking at the changes to libdrm, Mesa, and xf86-video drivers during this time, there were commits from 107 different developers but the developer with the most change-sets was Brian Paul, the creator of Mesa and now a VMware employee (following the Tungsten Graphics acquisition) who continues to contribute mostly to Mesa's Gallium3D architecture.

- The second most change-sets came from Eric Anholt at just 10.6% (Brian accounted for 10.7% of the work) followed by Gaetan Nadon, Vinson Lee, and Marek Olšák. Overall, Intel's Eric Anholt accounted for the most new lines of code as well as the number of removed lines of code.

- When looking at the video work done by employer in terms of change-sets, the top ten list comes down to: VMware (33.3%; mostly Gallium3D and core Mesa work), Intel (27.7%; their Intel code obviously plus the new GLSL compiler and other contributions), Videotron (7.7%), Marek Olšák (7.4%; a hobbyist most often working on the ATI Mesa / Gallium3D drivers), Kenneth Graunke (5.8%; hobbyist contributions to Intel, etc), LunarG (3.5%; the modern-day consulting equivalent of what Tungsten Graphics was, led by Jens Owen and Alan Ward), Red Hat (3.3%; mostly the ATI drivers plus Nouveau and various other contributions), Luca Barbieri (2.3%; Nouveau driver), Corbin Simpson (1.3%; ATI Gallium3D), and AMD (1.1%; the ATI code).

- Among other interesting facts that can be gathered from this X video data, community developers accounted for more work to the open-source ATI graphics drivers than was done during this development cycle by AMD itself. Granted, most of the past few months Alex Deucher and Richard Li at AMD were busy working on the Evergreen acceleration code that was only recently released to the public after clearing legal review. The AMD developers are now going back to work in private to begin supporting the yet-to-be-released AMD Radeon HD 6000 series graphics cards.

- While NVIDIA doesn't contribute to any open-source graphics drivers, when it comes to the X Conformance Test, they are the largest contributor with more than 90% of the changed lines of code being attributed to them -- largely NVIDIA's Aaron Plattner.

- Missing from any of these lists showing off contribution data for everything from X documentation to graphics drivers is Canonical. Canonical (Ubuntu) only had one sign-off during this entire time that was measured, as showed by this list.

All of these statistics are available in raw form on Tiago's blog.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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