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Linux 2.6.35 Kernel Officially Released

Linux Kernel

Published on 01 August 2010 08:33 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Linux Kernel
17 Comments

While it's no surprise, the Linux 2.6.35 kernel was just released this Sunday afternoon by Linus Torvalds.

The Linux 2.6.35 kernel introduces ATI power management support for those using the Radeon KMS driver, Intel H.264 VA-API support for newer Intel GMA chipsets, Radeon DRI2 sync and swap capabilities, Btrfs file-system improvements, and Receive Packet Steering (RPS) and Receive Flow Steering (RFS) support for transparently spreading of incoming network traffic load across available CPU cores. There's also a variety of other improvements across the other sub-systems as discussed on the KernelNewbies.org Wiki.

Our Linux kernel performance tracker that runs benchmarks of the very latest Linux kernel code on a daily basis had spotted a major performance regression within the Linux 2.6.35 kernel early on, but fortunately that issue was worked out. Overall the Linux 2.6.35 performance isn't much different from that of 2.6.34 or other recent releases, unless you're looking at the Btrfs performance or other areas directly touched by this kernel upgrade.

Linux 2.6.35 Kernel Officially Released


In the release announcement for the Linux 2.6.35 kernel, Linus notes his new policy of being more strict about merging new code into his Git tree after the -rc1 release worked out better this time around and resulted in significantly less commits than usual. With the Linux 2.6.36 kernel, Linus will continue to be stiff about not accepting new pull requests after the first release candidate. Linus is also rather concerned about the state of the linux-next tree for Linux 2.6.36, but at the same time he is very excited about a set of VFS scalability patches that will be merged into this next kernel. "On a slightly happier note: one thing I do hope we can merge in the upcoming merge window is Nick Piggin's cool VFS scalability series. I've been using it on my own machine, and gone through all the commits (not that I shouldn't go through some of them some more), and am personally really excited about it. It's seldom we see major performance improvements in core code that are quite that noticeable, and Nick's whole RCU pathname lookup in particular just tickles me pink."

The Linux 2.6.35 kernel is what's being picked up by Ubuntu 10.10 and other Linux distributions providing major updates within the next couple of months. We'll have out more Linux 2.6.35 benchmarks shortly.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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