1. Computers
  2. Display Drivers
  3. Graphics Cards
  4. Memory
  5. Motherboards
  6. Processors
  7. Software
  8. Storage
  9. Operating Systems


Facebook RSS Twitter Twitter Google Plus


Phoronix Test Suite

OpenBenchmarking.org

Plymouth In Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 2: Dead Simple

Ubuntu

Published on 14 January 2010 02:08 PM EST
Written by Michael Larabel in Ubuntu
12 Comments

A month ago we wrote about Plymouth getting pulled into Ubuntu 10.04 LTS after Canonical ended up flip-flopping on their decision to use this Red Hat created splash program that leverages kernel mode-setting to provide a pleasant and flicker-free boot experience while being highly customizable and extensible. After the Plymouth packages got pulled into Ubuntu 10.04 LTS we also provided a video that showed it running on the "Lucid Lynx", but it was pretty boring with just a static Ubuntu logo and at the time some warning messages bled into the background.

Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 2 is scheduled to be released today and it will feature Plymouth instead of USplash. The udev warning messages have since been cleared up, but the artwork remains the same. The entire Plymouth splash plug-in for Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Alpha 2 is just an Ubuntu logo that sits there. No fading, no progress bar, nothing. At least the logo is now being shown at the screen's native resolution and if hitting the ESC key you get to see the boot messages also at a nice resolution thanks to KMS.

Right now Ubuntu 10.04 is using a Plymouth 0.8 snapshot and we have successfully tested the latest Lucid packages using Intel and ATI kernel mode-setting. Below is a photograph of this Plymouth plug-in as of today's Ubuntu Lucid packages, which will hopefully be enhanced by the artwork team before Ubuntu 10.04 LTS final is released in April. Using Red Hat's Plymouth besides Ubuntu and Fedora is also Mandriva since their 2010.0 release.

Plymouth In Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 2: Dead Simple


About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
Latest Articles & Reviews
  1. Khronos Group Announces Vulkan, OpenCL 2.1, SPIR-V
  2. Samsung 850 EVO SSD Linux Benchmarks
  3. Kubuntu 15.04 Is Turning Out Quite Nice, Good Way To Try Out The Latest KDE
  4. 5-Way Linux Distribution Comparison On The Core i3 NUC
  5. OCZ ARC 100 Linux SSD Benchmarks
  6. Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Works Great As A Linux Ultrabook
Latest Linux News
  1. Gitorious Gets Acquired By GitLab
  2. Unity 5.0 Brings PhysX 3.3, WebGL Preview, Animation System Work
  3. Linux 4.0-rc2 Kernel Released After Delay Due To Intel DRM Driver
  4. Linux 3.19 Officially Lands For Ubuntu 15.04
  5. Clutter Now Supports Quad-Buffer Stereo Displays, Mir Backend
  6. Pricing Details On The Alleged MJ Ubuntu Tablet Design
  7. Understanding The Linux Kernel's BPF In-Kernel Virtual Machine
  8. Another Software Patent That Should Be Tossed Out
  9. Imagination Already Has A Vulkan Driver In The Works For PowerVR GPUs
  10. A Provisional Specification To SPIR-V
Most Viewed News This Week
  1. More Proof That Allwinner Is Violating The GPL
  2. The Tremendous Features Of Fedora 22
  3. Krita 2.9 Released, Their Biggest Release Ever
  4. A Single UEFI Executable With The Linux Kernel, Initrd & Command Line
  5. LLVM 3.6 & Clang 3.6 Deliver More Features, Complete C++14 Support
  6. Xfce 4.12 Released After Nearly Three Years Of Work
  7. Firefox 36 Brings Full HTTP/2 Support
  8. ALSA 1.0.29 Released
%%CLICK_URL_UNESC%%