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Intel Core 2 Duo PC & Laptops

Intel

Published on 08 May 2006 01:00 AM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in Intel
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SANTA CLARA, Calif., May 8, 2006 -- The Inte Core2 Duo processor is the new brand for Intel Corporation's upcoming powerful and more energy-efficient processor families for desktop and laptop computers that will arrive in the third quarter, the company announced today.

Formerly codenamed Conroe and Merom, the Intel Core2 Duo processors for desktop and notebooks PCs respectively are based on the newly designed Intel Core2 microarchitecture and will include two processing cores -- or brains -- per chip, hence the "Duo" addition. Intel will also call its highest performing processor for enthusiast and gamers the Intel Core2 Extreme processor.

These ground-breaking processors will be built on Intel's advanced 65-nanometer design and manufacturing process technology that shrinks a processo's circuitry and transistors. This combination will deliver higher-performing, yet more energy-efficient processors that will spur more capable, stylish, silent and smaller mobile and desktop PCs while saving on electricity usage.

"With this unified PC and notebook brand and microarchitecture, everyone will have a simple way to choose the most powerful and energy-efficient processors in the world, and developers will be able to more easily write optimized software just once for a variety of computing segments," said Eric Kim, Intel senior vice president and chief marketing officer. "We want these processors to be the heart and soul of computers that are increasingly bringing magic to our digital lifestyles."

Having a common microarchitecture for the consumer, gaming, notebook and business desktop market segments makes it easier for computer developers to create more efficient software applications and can share capabilities across all categories if necessary.

The dual-core processors will include the industry's largest integrated cache or memory reservoir called Intel Advanced Smart Cache that includes a unique design for faster performance on memory intensive applications. The products will also support such features as enhanced security, virtualization and manageability built right into the processors.

Consumers and businesses will also be able to purchase these processors as part of Intel's market-focused platforms, a collection of Intel hardware and software technology innovation designed and tested together and tailored to specific computing needs. Intel offers wireless computing, in-home entertainment or business productivity platforms through the company's Intel Centrino Duo mobile technology, Intel Viiv technology and Intel vPro technology brands respectively, all of which are powered by versions of these new processors.

Starting with these new brands, the "2" will signal the arrival of a new generation of technology to the Intel Core2 processor line. In order to be consistent with current Intel Core processor naming, Intel will continue to use such terms as "Duo" to creatively and effectively indicate the number of processing cores per product.

More at Intel.


About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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