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Got Any Questions For NVIDIA About Linux?

NVIDIA

Published on 31 August 2009 07:29 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in NVIDIA
119 Comments

If you have any (non-tech support) questions about NVIDIA and Linux, ask away! Phoronix will be hosting a question and answer session with NVIDIA regarding their Linux graphics driver. If you have any questions to ask, click on the "Comments and Discussion" button below and ask away in our forums. After a few days we will be narrowing down the list of questions before NVIDIA begins answering them.

Below is a list of a few questions to get going (listed in no particular order).

- How does the driver team ascribe priority to what will be developed in each release?
- What code management do they use and are team members allowed to keep private branches in order to target specific issues (like new kernel or X.Org support)?
- Which text editors or IDEs do your developers use?
- Is development work done mostly on x86 or x86_64 systems?
- What applications, tools, and games do the developers use for testing regressions and speed?
- How has the managerial view of Linux changed within NVIDIA over the past few years?
- About what percentage of the driver's code-base is shared between Linux and Windows platforms?
- How many people work on the Linux driver at NVIDIA? If you're not able to give out an exact number, what is the relationship between the Windows and Linux driver team sizes?
- Are there any plans to provide a new NVIDIA Linux installer, perhaps one that is able to be executed from within a running X session and have a GTK/Qt interface?
- How do you go about marketing/evangelizing the Linux driver to developers and publishers?
- Are you starting to see more interest in the driver from companies or publishers?
- Are there any plans in place to provide new features within the xf86-video-nv driver or to better engage with the Nouveau developers for some open-source support?
- Do you see the Linux gaming landscape changing drastically in the future?
- Are there any intentions to port future NVIDIA technology demos to Linux?
- Are you encouraging your AIB/OEM/ODM partners to advertise Linux support on their products or to display the Tux logo?
- Are any AIB/OEM/ODM partners distributing your Linux driver(s) on their driver CDs?
- Overall, what percentage of your customers do you believe use Linux?
- Do you believe that the overall market-share for Linux will continue to grow?
- Within the next 12 months, where do you hope the NVIDIA Linux driver will be in regards to features, adoption, and support?
- How are your efforts going in supporting RandR 1.2/1.3 within your driver?
- Does you have any intentions to provide Kernel-based Mode-Setting support?
- What were NVIDIA's motives behind creating VDPAU?

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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