Intel Provides Temporary e1000e Fix
Written by Michael Larabel in Linux Kernel on 2 October 2008 at 09:15 AM EDT. 8 Comments
In the Linux 2.6.27 kernel code was a rather serious regression where a faulty driver is killing Intel network hardware. Specifically the e1000 and e1000e network adapters were getting their EEPROM corrupted by the driver, which renders the network interface permanently inoperable unless that non-volatile memory can be restored. The e1000 problem was patched but the Intel e1000e remains problematic. Fortunately, Intel has now provided a workaround so that no further Intel network hardware is damaged.

A patch was proposed by Intel last night on the Linux kernel mailing list that prevents the e1000e non-volatile memory (NVM) from being corrupted when the respective Linux driver is loaded. There is no proper fix yet to this situation but Intel is continuing to explore the problem. Intel is also preparing patches that help users with damaged network hardware restore their EEPROM. For the Linux 2.6.28 kernel, Intel will push forward patches that clean up the network driver's use of
the hardware/software semaphore.

About The Author
Author picture

Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated benchmarking software. He can be followed via Twitter or contacted via MichaelLarabel.com.

Related Linux Kernel News
Popular News
Trending Reviews & Featured Articles