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X Gets Predictable Pointer Acceleration

X.Org

Published on 15 August 2008 02:26 PM EDT
Written by Michael Larabel in X.Org
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X.Org 7.4 / X Server 1.5 has experienced an incredibly long delay in getting out the door. It was originally supposed to ship in February, then May, and now its stagnate until Mesa 7.1 ships. It looks like it will be a late August or early September release, which is almost a year after X.Org 7.3 had shipped.

If the delays alone weren't bad enough, this X update will be shipping with a slimmer set of features than what was originally expected. Most recently DRI2 was dropped from X.Org 7.4 due to the TTM vs. GEM kernel memory manager situation, but it also lost out on Multi-Pointer X (MPX) and other features.

Permitting these features don't get further delayed, X.Org 7.5 / X Server 1.6 will hopefully end up being a nice release. We don't expect this next update to ship until the middle of next year or so, but it already contains the MPX integration, input improvements, and should contain a fixed up version of the Direct Rendering Infrastructure 2. In addition, a new acceleration method has been announced for the X Server.

Last week the UXA acceleration architecture was announced by Keith Packard as a GEM-ified architecture based upon EXA acceleration, but this isn't to be confused with this new announcement. In fact, this announcement by Simon Thum is for Predictable Pointer Acceleration.

The predictable part of this mouse pointer acceleration is to tell whether the pointer will move. Its features include user-selectable profiles control pointer acceleration, adaptive and constant deceleration, acceleration becomes predictable, and no overshoot when X blocks for a short time. Planned for the future is sub-pixel position and velocity and velocity estimation. However, most users likely won't notice this change when it goes into effect. This has been proposed for X Server 1.6.

The announcement for this new pointer acceleration can be read on the X.Org mailing list. Detailed documentation surrounding X's Predictable Pointer Acceleration can be found on the X.Org Wiki.

About The Author
Michael Larabel is the principal author of Phoronix.com and founded the web-site in 2004 with a focus on enriching the Linux hardware experience and being the largest web-site devoted to Linux hardware reviews, particularly for products relevant to Linux gamers and enthusiasts but also commonly reviewing servers/workstations and embedded Linux devices. Michael has written more than 10,000 articles covering the state of Linux hardware support, Linux performance, graphics hardware drivers, and other topics. Michael is also the lead developer of the Phoronix Test Suite, Phoromatic, and OpenBenchmarking.org automated testing software. He can be followed via and or contacted via .
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